New Microsoft Office Word Document - Copy (40) - Copy - Copy

New Microsoft Office Word Document - Copy (40) - Copy -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Gravitation From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Gravity ) "Gravity" redirects here. For other uses, see Gravity (disambiguation) . This article is about the natural phenomenon. For other uses, see Gravitation (disambiguation) . Gravitation keeps the planets in orbits around the Sun. (Not to scale) Gravitation , or gravity , is a natural phenomenon by which physical bodies attract with a force proportional to their mass. In everyday life, gravitation is most familiar as the agent that gives weight to objects with mass and causes them to fall to the ground when dropped. Gravitation causes dispersed matter to coalesce, and coalesced matter to remain intact, thus accounting for the existence of the Earth , the Sun , and most of the macroscopic objects in the universe . Gravitation is responsible for keeping the Earth and the other planets in their orbits around the Sun; for keeping the Moon in its orbit around the Earth; for the formation of tides ; for natural convection , by which fluid flow occurs under the influence of a density gradient and gravity; for heating the interiors of forming stars and planets to very high temperatures; and for various other phenomena observed on Earth. Gravitation is one of the four fundamental interactions of nature, along with the strong force , electromagnetism and the weak force . Modern physics describes gravitation using the general theory of relativity , in which gravitation is a consequence of the curvature
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
of spacetime which governs the motion of inertial objects. The simpler Newton's law of universal gravitation provides an accurate approximation for most calculations. Contents [ hide ] 1 History of gravitational theory o 1.1 Scientific revolution o 1.2 Newton's theory of gravitation o 1.3 Equivalence principle o 1.4 General relativity o 1.5 Gravity and quantum mechanics 2 Specifics o 2.1 Earth's gravity o 2.2 Equations for a falling body near the surface of the Earth o 2.3 Gravity and astronomy o 2.4 Gravitational radiation 3 Anomalies and discrepancies 4 Alternative theories o 4.1 Historical alternative theories o 4.2 Recent alternative theories 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Footnotes 8 References 9 Further reading History of gravitational theory
Background image of page 2
Main article: History of gravitational theory Scientific revolution Modern work on gravitational theory began with the work of Galileo Galilei in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. In his famous (though possibly apocryphal [1] ) experiment dropping balls from the Tower of Pisa , and later with careful measurements of balls rolling down inclines , Galileo showed that gravitation accelerates all objects at the same rate. This was a major departure from Aristotle 's belief that heavier objects accelerate faster. [2]
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

New Microsoft Office Word Document - Copy (40) - Copy -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online