Test 2 Study Guide

Test 2 Study Guide - Chapter 5: Understanding Consumer...

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Chapter 5: Understanding Consumer Behavior Lists Purchase Decision Process 1) Problem Recognition 2) Information Search 3) Alternative Evaluation 4) Purchase Decision 5) Post-purchase Behavior Risk Factors 1) The amount at stake 2) The probability that you will do well Types of Reference Groups 1) Membership Groups 2) Aspiration Groups 3) Dissociative Groups Models of Consumption Behavior 1) Economic Model: Says that man is a rational animal (people rationally analyze purchase decisions). It is true by definition. It is normative (how things should be), rather than descriptive. It does not explain rationale. 2) Learning Model: Most of consumer behavior is learned. Has to do with stimulus generalization (when a response elicited by one stimulus is generalized to another stimulus), and stimulus discrimination (a person’s ability to perceive differences in stimuli).
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3) Psychoanalytical Model: States that you buy things for their functionality as well as their symbol. Subliminal messages (“below limits”, you are not aware of messages because they go beyond your perceptions or senses) do not work, but people still believe they work despite little scientific support 4) Social Physiological (Sociocultural) Model: Has to do with cultures, subcultures (e.g. ethnic, racial, and geographical), and social class, and how that effects consumption behavior. Definitions Model: Representation of a real life situation or system Perception: The process by which an individual selects, organizes, and interprets information to create a meaningful picture of the world Culture: A set of values, ideas, and attitudes that are learned and shared among the members of a group Subculture: Subgroups with unique values, ideas, and attitudes Social Class: Divisions in society in which people sharing similar values, interests, and behaviors can be grouped Reference Groups: People to whom an individual looks as a basis for self appraisal, or as a source of personal standards Self-Concept: The way people view themselves, and the way they think others view them (reference groups) Stories/Examples The story about the guy who overhears not to take a certain professor for finance is an example of people not seeking information from someone who knows what they are talking about. The story of the two families that both had family cars but one family had another nice car, while the other family had an old cheap car is an example of symbolism. (The old and new cars were symbols of the respective families) The fact that the U.S. has changed from a saving society to a spending society is an example of how consumption behavior changes when culture changes. (People
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buy more now(change in consumption behavior) then they used to (change in culture)) The story about people who drink hot tea being viewed negatively is an example of how difficult it is to change an image once it is set. Stressed Topics
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Test 2 Study Guide - Chapter 5: Understanding Consumer...

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