maya film 2 - Hollywood in the 40s and 50s Orson Welles -...

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Hollywood in the 40s and 50s Orson Welles - Welles, a young maverick of the radio, was given an unprecedented contract by RKO Pictures in 1940, which gave him complete artistic control over his first feature film. - The result, Citizen Kane (1941), is widely considered to be the greatest film of all time. Citizen Kane - Citizen Kane tells the life story of wealthy newspaperman Charles Foster Kane (not so loosely based on actual newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst) as told by his scorned friends and lovers. - Hearst was so offended by Kane that he used all of his power to discredit the film, successfully dampening Welles’ career and causing Kane to be overlooked by the film community for over two decades. - As attendance spiked in the 1930s, the US government had taken notice of Hollywood’s vertical integration structure. - In particular, the practice of block booking—only selling major features in combination with less popular films to non-studio owned theaters—was seen as contributing to the quickly growing monopolies in Hollywood. The Paramount Decree - In 1940, the Government issued a decree that Paramount, the leading studio of the five majors, had to stop its practice of block booking. -
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maya film 2 - Hollywood in the 40s and 50s Orson Welles -...

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