e_504 - What Constitutes Plagiarism? Read the following...

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What Constitutes Plagiarism? Read the following quotations from John Clive and Eric Hobsbawm. Selections 1-3 and Selections 1-4 are ways in which someone might use this information in a paper. Which of these constitute plagiarism and which are acceptable? Compare the examples and decide whether they are or are not examples of plagiarism. Explain your reasons for why. Original source: What is the significance of these statistics? The most obvious and, at the same time, the most striking fact they reveal is that in a period of twelve years the current circulation of the Edinburgh Review (i.e. the first printing) increased nearly twentyfold, from seven hundred and fifty to 13,000 copies. To put this figure in perspective, it may be recalled that the circulation of The Times in 1816 was only 8,000 copies daily. John Clive, Scotch Reviewers: The Edinburgh Review, 1802-1815 , p.135. Selection 1: The Edinburgh Review was one of the most popular and influential periodicals in Britain during
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e_504 - What Constitutes Plagiarism? Read the following...

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