9396lec2W11 - 1/18/2011 ENGI 9396: Engineering Management...

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1/18/2011 1 ENGI 9396: Engineering Management Topics Lecture 2 Dr. Amy Hsiao Winter 2011 Introduction Technology innovation The process by which technological ideas are generated, developed, and transformed into new business products, processes, and services by an entrepreneurial enterprise. This innovation is thus used to make profit, establish marketplace presence, and be a competitive advantage for the innovating enterprise. Potential opportunities Changes in external factors Technological transitions A dual-perspective approach Engineering design Strategic management planning The limited-market environment of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) product-market view of strategy resource-based strategy (Burgelman, Christensen, Wheelwright, 2004)
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1/18/2011 2 Innovation Collaboration Dissemination Participation Basic Science Research Strategic positioning Knowledge and technology transfer Organizational planning Engineering Management Strategic risk management Leadership Open systems evaluation Technology Venture The Innovation Process The “Ladder” Model of Innovation Entrepreneurs Investors Stakeholders Functional Groups/Task Forces Commercialization University Government Agencies Incubation Centers Patents/New Product Development Technology Transfer Professor/Researchers Students/Researchers Basic Science Research
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1/18/2011 3 The Cyclical Model of Innovation Product Market Incremental Change “New” Product Same Market Patterns of Development New technology products and services begin with a low level of performance based on potential customer needs. Measure of performance vs. Measure of effort invested
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1/18/2011 4 Patterns of Development Likely to be inferior to existing alternatives when first introduced. Must obtain capital and invest in further development to make new technology (product, service) competitive Established firms keep making incremental changes, until there is diminishing returns. The Technology S-Curve of Innovation Strategic Engineering Management (Reference: Foster, R.N. Innovation: The Attacker’s Advantage , New York, NY: Summit Books, 1986.)
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5 Optimization for Managers Continually look for ways to shorten the incubation period or increase the measure of performance over a smaller measure of effort. There are several discrete points in this “cyclical model” that may point to potential opportunities First, the point at which the rate of growth begins to decrease, the inflection point, should be an indication that an existing product may have room for a substitute product, or a similar, competitive product with an incremental improvement Planning strategically “at the inflection point” can match the point of activation, of breakthrough, with the old technology’s point of maximum performance Disruptive Technology and the S-Curve of
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9396lec2W11 - 1/18/2011 ENGI 9396: Engineering Management...

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