DQ reply 2 wk 4

DQ reply 2 wk 4 - I think the situation for the CFO is very...

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I think the situation for the CFO is very black and white. When asking how the CFO can balance the commitment to company with the allegiance to other officers, it seems clear to me that the obligation is ultimately to the shareholders, which means maintaining and presenting accurate financial information. While it may be tempting to give into pressure from other executives in order to appear to be a "team player" I do not see why any CFO would risk doing that. Especially in light of Sarbanes-Oxley which provides criminal liability, up to 20 years in prison, for key officers who participate in that type of conduct. As a CFO, if you violate provisions of that law, the responsibility falls on you individually and those executives who pressured you into doing something questionable are not going to, nor can they, take that responsibility off of you. On the other hand, if there are different ways of presenting information and both are accurate, then there is nothing wrong with presenting what is more favorable. One example that might be applicable under that scenario is business valuations.
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DQ reply 2 wk 4 - I think the situation for the CFO is very...

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