PP1001-Lecture5-Civilrts-socialmovements

PP1001-Lecture5-Civilrts-socialmovements - Social Movements...

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Social Movements: basic principle is equality
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Movements are more than a policy. They are characterized by: A big picture “cause” A long timeframe: A host of policies Significant resistance
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Civil Rights Movement Distinction between civil rights and civil liberties Civil rights: rights granted by the government to citizens in order to protect individuals against unequal treatment and fairness (race, gender, disability, etc.) Civil liberties: basic rights guaranteed to all citizens (freedom of speech, right to privacy, right to be free from unreasonable searches of your home, right to a fair court trial, right to marry, right to vote, etc.) Like many other movements, goal is achieving equality Political equality: all citizens have the right to participate in the government, and to choose or remove public officials by voting Social equality: all citizens of a society have completely equal treatment, opportunity, and access to resources Economic equality: all citizens are equally wealthy, and have the same status in the economy, because they have had the same opportunities, non discriminant on race, gender, skill, culture, or wealth condensation
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Civil Rights Movement In the revolutionary period Dred Scott decision (1857) Supreme Court declared that no slave or descendent of a slave could be a U.S. citizen or ever had been a U.S. citizen. Ultimately widened the political and social gap between the North and South and took the nation closer to the brink of the Civil War, Emancipation Proclamation (1863) Order issued in 1863 by Abraham Lincoln that proclaimed the freedom of 3.1 million slaves
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This note was uploaded on 03/29/2011 for the course PP 1001 taught by Professor Dautrich during the Spring '08 term at UConn.

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PP1001-Lecture5-Civilrts-socialmovements - Social Movements...

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