Lecture 18 - Body Weight2 - Lecture 18: Body Weight...

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Lecture 18: Body Weight Recommended Readings: From Thompson et al, The Science of  Nutrition, parts of Chapter 13.
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Important Words 2 Anthropometry Bioelectric impedance analysis Body weight percentile Calipers DXA Failure to thrive Healthy body weight Metabolic fitness Obese Overweight Skin-fold thickness Underweight
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Lecture Outline Defining healthful body weight Importance of a healthful body weight Measuring healthful weight Genetic factors that may regulate energy  intake, body weight and body  composition The importance of lifestyle and habits Summary 3
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Healthy Weight Implies Reduced Risk of Disease Adult BMI Disease Risk Unhealthy Healthy Unhealthy 4
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How is “Healthy Weight” Measured? NIDDK Website BMI (Body Mass Index) 18.5 25 30 BMI = Wt (kg) / Ht (cm) 2 Underweight 5
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There are Racial Differences in In Adults: BMI <18.5  = Underweight BMI of 18.5-25 = “Normal” BMI 25-30  = Overweight BMI >30  = Obese % in California 2004, CBRFFS African American = 70.5% Latino, Hispanic = 69.6% White = 53% Other = 40.4% 6
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Defining “Healthy Weight” in Children Reference data collected  from 1963-1994. See CDC website. In children, standards are not  in “absolute” BMI units since  body composition naturally  changes as children mature;  and body composition naturally  differs for boys and girls, with  differences accentuated at  puberty. 7
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Weight Status Categories in Children Equal to or greater than the 95th  percentile Obese 85th to less than the 95th percentile Overweight 5th percentile to less than the 85th  percentile  Healthy weight Less than the 5th percentile Underweight Percentile Range (matched for  age and gender) Weight Status  Category 8
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Prevalence of High BMI in Boys and Girls Aged
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This note was uploaded on 03/30/2011 for the course NUTRI SCI 10 taught by Professor Amy during the Spring '08 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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Lecture 18 - Body Weight2 - Lecture 18: Body Weight...

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