Genome 371 Lecture 1 - Genome 371 Lecture 1 1/26/11 4:15 PM...

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1/26/11 4:15 PM Genome 371 Lecture 1 Page 1 of 15 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_01.html Lecture 1 The Central Dogma 1 Oct 2010 Lecture 1 handout (pdf) Subscribe to podcast: Slide 1 Slide 2 Home Course mechanics Help hours Calendar Syllabus Lectures, Podcasts Quiz Sections Practice problems Exams GoPost Send email to class Useful links The Gradiator
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1/26/11 4:15 PM Genome 371 Lecture 1 Page 2 of 15 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_01.html Slide 3 Slide 4 Slide 5 Slide 6
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1/26/11 4:15 PM Genome 371 Lecture 1 Page 3 of 15 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_01.html Slide 7 Slide 8 Slide 9
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1/26/11 4:15 PM Genome 371 Lecture 1 Page 4 of 15 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_01.html Slide 10 Slide 11 Slide 12 Slide 13
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1/26/11 4:15 PM Genome 371 Lecture 1 Page 5 of 15 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_01.html Slide 14 Slide 15 Three things to remember about DNA and RNA: (1) A pairs with T (U in RNA), G pairs with C (2) base-paired strands are antiparallel (3) chain elongation of DNA or RNA can occur only by addition of nucleotides to the 3'-OH. You can use these first principles to solve problems such as the one on slide 19 (p.1-10 of the lecture handout). Slide 16 Please note that I am using the term "promoter" very loosely here to refer to all upstream regulatory sequences that may be involved in control of gene transcription. When people write out the DNA sequence of these regulatory regions, they often will write the sequence of just the coding strand rather than writing it as double-stranded DNA. Note, however, that the proteins involved in recognizing the regulatory sequences and controlling transcription will be making contacts with both the coding and the non-coding strands, not just the coding strand. Note also that the term "copy" in these two slides is loose shorthand: as discussed in class, a longer but more accurate description of transcription would be to say that an RNA molecule complementary to a portion of one of the DNA strands is synthesized (i.e., the new RNA is made using the standard rules of base pairing and is antiparallel to the DNA strand that is being used as template) .
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1/26/11 4:15 PM Genome 371 Lecture 1 Page 6 of 15 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_01.html Slide 17 Slides 18 and 19 This picture represents a snapshot of a number of RNA polymerases all in the process of transcribing the same gene--some that have just begun transcribing the gene and some that have almost finished transcribing the gene. [If it helps, picture a bunch of spiders marching along a rope,
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2011 for the course GENOME 371 taught by Professor Unsure during the Spring '03 term at University of Washington.

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Genome 371 Lecture 1 - Genome 371 Lecture 1 1/26/11 4:15 PM...

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