Genome 371 Lecture 6 - Genome 371 Lecture 6 1/26/11 4:16 PM...

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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 6 Page 1 of 16 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_06.html Lecture 6 Mutations and Phenotypes-2 18 Oct 2010 Lecture 6 handout (pdf) Subscribe to podcast: Slide 1 Slide 2 Slide 3 Home Course mechanics Help hours Calendar Syllabus Lectures, Podcasts Quiz Sections Practice problems Exams GoPost Send email to class Useful links The Gradiator
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 6 Page 2 of 16 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_06.html Slide 4 Slide 5 Slide 6 Slide 7
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 6 Page 3 of 16 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_06.html Slide 8 Slide 9 Slide 10 Slide 11 As discussed in class, one other piece of info that's needed to make the judgement of whether the GOF/wildtype heterozygote would show the GOF phenotype or the wild type phenotype: a wild type/LOF heterozygote behaves like a wild type homozygote.
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 6 Page 4 of 16 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_06.html Slide 12 Same here. .. a single functioning copy of the lactase gene is sufficient to allow lactose digestion in early childhood, so presumably a single copy that is expressed past childhood will also be sufficient to allow lactose digestion past childhood. Slide 13 Slide 14 As we discussed, a cohesin gene mutation that resulted in cohesin being resistant to separase would be considered a gain-of-function mutation. Slide 15
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 6 Page 5 of 16 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_06.html Slide 16 Slide 17 Earlier in the quarter, I used the analogy of a recipe made with different spiciness levels as "alleles" of a recipe. Can you extend that analogy further -- using spice levels or ingredients in a recipe to come up with parallels for: dominant vs. recessive incomplete dominance co-dominance Slidse 18 and 19 The judgment of mode of inheritance (dominant/recessive, etc.) depends on what is defined as the phenotype we are examining. In the example on this slide, if we define the phenotype as albino vs. non-albino, then the mode of inheritance clearly is dominant/recessive ( cc is albino, CC and Cc are both non-albino, therefore C is dominant over c ). But if we were to look not at the overall body phenotype but instead look at the tyrosinase enzyme level, then the situation looks more like incomplete dominance ( Cc produces enzyme level in-between what is seen with CC and cc ). Typically, of course, we are interested in the "whole person" and therefore wouldn't consider just enzyme levels while making a judgement regarding mode of inheritance -- but I am making the point here that one needs to be careful about defining what phenotype one is looking at. Note also that we DO NOT KNOW ahead of time
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2011 for the course GENOME 371 taught by Professor Unsure during the Spring '03 term at University of Washington.

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Genome 371 Lecture 6 - Genome 371 Lecture 6 1/26/11 4:16 PM...

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