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Genome 371 Lecture 7 - Genome 371 Lecture 7 4:16 PM Home...

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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 7 Page 1 of 8 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_07.html Lecture 7 Creating mutants 22 Oct 2010 Lecture 07 handout (pdf) Subscribe to podcast: Slide 1 Slide 2 Home Course mechanics Help hours Calendar Syllabus Lectures, Podcasts Quiz Sections Practice problems Exams GoPost Send email to class Useful links The Gradiator
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 7 Page 2 of 8 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_07.html Slide 3 X-linked trait... affected women: each child has a 50% chance of being affected, assuming the mom is heterozygous. Slide 4 Slide 5 Each cell in the XX embryo independently and randomly inactivates one of the two X chromosomes in the cell; the mitotic descendants of this cell maintain the inactive state of the X (i.e., if one X in an XX cell is inactivated, the each of the two daughter cells arising by mitosis from that cell also have the same X inactivated). "Inactivation" here refers to transcription: we say that one of the X chromosomes is "inactivated" because most of the genes on that copy of the X chromosomes have been turned off. The genes haven't been damaged as part of the inactivation; they are just prevented from being transcribed. Cells of the germline re-activate the inactive X prior to meiosis so that the gametes don't get inactive X chromosomes. (Note: As discussed briefly in class, there are exceptions; some genes on the inactive X are known to escape inactivation. And, in some cases the inactivation is not random but shows a preference for the maternally or the paternally derived X.)
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 7 Page 3 of 8 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_07.html
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