Genome 371 Lecture 9 - Genome 371 Lecture 9 1/26/11 4:16 PM...

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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 9 Page 1 of 13 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_09.html Lecture 9 Analyzing mutants-2 29 Oct 2010 Lecture 9 handout (pdf) Subscribe to podcast: Slide 1 Slide 2 Slide 3 Home Course mechanics Help hours Calendar Syllabus Lectures, Podcasts Quiz Sections Practice problems Exams GoPost Send email to class Useful links The Gradiator
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 9 Page 2 of 13 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_09.html Slide 4 Slide 5 Slide 6 Slide 7 Note the general properties/requirements for the system to work: a dominant marker in the transposon (to allow us to track the transposon), a dominant marker linked to the transposase, etc.
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 9 Page 3 of 13 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_09.html Slide 8 Slide 9 Slide 10 Diploids form at the intersection of the two streaks on the plate, where the cells of the different mating types can encounter each other. If the diploid (heterozygote) is able to grow after replica-platting onto the selective (-adenine) plate, the mutation must be recessive. [**How do we ensure that all growth at the intersection is because of diploids and not wild type haploids? See explanation below if you are curious. .. but for now, accept that there are ways to ensure that if there is any growth at the intersection of the streaks on -adenine plates, it is only because of diploids.] Slide 11
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 9 Page 4 of 13 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_09.html Slide 12 In this example, the diploid (heterozygote formed by mating the two mutants) is able to grow, so the mutations must be in different genes. Slide 13 Slide 14 Complementation group = group of mutations that fail to complement each other; the interpretation is that they are alleles of the same gene. Slide 15
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1/26/11 4:16 PM Genome 371 Lecture 9 Page 5 of 13 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_09.html Slide 16 Slide 17 Slide 18 We can postulate as a hypothesis that in the ade1 mutant, the "production line" cannot proceed beyond the intermediate metabolite "X". .. but the production line leading up to synthesis of "X" is still proceeding, so the cellular concentration of "X" builds up. If that concentration gets high enough, a side reaction can occur, converting "X" into a red-colored side-product. (Note: alternative hypotheses are possible also, but this is one that people generally believe, due to other bits of evidence that we didn't cover.) Slide 19
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This note was uploaded on 03/31/2011 for the course GENOME 371 taught by Professor Unsure during the Spring '03 term at University of Washington.

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Genome 371 Lecture 9 - Genome 371 Lecture 9 1/26/11 4:16 PM...

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