Genome 371 Lecture 14 - Genome 371 Lecture 14 1/26/11 4:17...

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1/26/11 4:17 PM Genome 371 Lecture 14 Page 1 of 8 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_14.html Lecture 14 Mapping genes in humans 19 Nov 2010 Lecture 14 handout (pdf) Subscribe to podcast: Slide 1 Slide 2 Home Course mechanics Help hours Calendar Syllabus Lectures, Podcasts Quiz Sections Practice problems Exams GoPost Send email to class Useful links The Gradiator
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1/26/11 4:17 PM Genome 371 Lecture 14 Page 2 of 8 http://courses.washington.edu/au371mkr/resources/lecture_notes/lecture_14.html Slide 3 Slide 4 For any given polymorphic locus, many different alleles may exist in the population (depending on the nature of the polymorphism, e.g., SNP vs. microsatellite repeat). For a locus that has just two equally frequent alleles in the population, the probability that two randomly chosen (diploid) individuals will have the same genotype for that one locus = 0.375 (how do we derive that?). As we consider loci with more alleles in the population (e.g., microsatellites), the probability that two randomly chosen individuals will have the same genotype decreases. If we then start considering many different polymorphic loci, then the probability that two randomly chosen individuals will have the same genotype at all those loci becomes miniscule. Slide 5
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Genome 371 Lecture 14 - Genome 371 Lecture 14 1/26/11 4:17...

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