Vishal Patel - unknown object to be 23.6g To help us find the percent of error we used the formula(vector(A B angle(vector C angle x 100 360 ° The

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Vishal Patel Newton’s First Law: Equilibrium Period 10 Objective: To determine how to apply Newton’s First Law in component form to determine the angle and magnitude of a third force needed to place a system in equilibrium. Conclusion: Newton’s First Law states that an object at rest will remain at rest unless disturbed by an external (net) force. The use of a force table is able to help us find out the angle and mass of a third force on a point. For the first part we got 70g for the mass of the third side and 173 ° . For part 2 we got 84.8g for the mass and 173 ° for the third side. To get the mass of the unknown object, we put it on a hanger and then put the 3 hangers at 120 ° apart from eachother meaning that they would have to be the same for the force to be in equilibrium. We found out that the mass was 28.6g and the hangers had a mass of 5g so the unknown object would be 28.6g-5g, which is 23.6g. This makes the mass of the
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Unformatted text preview: unknown object to be 23.6g. To help us find the percent of error, we used the formula: (vector (A+B) angle)-(vector C angle) x 100 360 ° The relationship between A, B, and C is that they should add up to 0 for equilibrium. To find the percent error, you must find the magnitude of vectors A and B. The X components are 55sin45+55sin300 and the Y components are 55cos45+55cos300. You put the y/x and find the tan-1 of that number. You get the value of 25%, after subtracting the vector angle C and adding the vectors, then dividing by 360 and then multiplying by 100. Error in this experiment may have came from the string connecting the hangers to the point in middle may have been off target making the angles wrong. Then there may also be the error that the point was not exactly in the middle and was still a minor bit off that we would not be able to calculate because it may be smaller then our smallest weights....
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This note was uploaded on 04/02/2011 for the course EXPOSITORY 101 taught by Professor Mr during the Spring '06 term at Rutgers.

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Vishal Patel - unknown object to be 23.6g To help us find the percent of error we used the formula(vector(A B angle(vector C angle x 100 360 ° The

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