com155_Ch28 - 28 Adjectives and Adverbs Describing Which...

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Unformatted text preview: 28 Adjectives and Adverbs Describing Which One? or How? Understand What Adjectives and Adverbs Are Adjectives describe nouns (words that name people, places, or things) and pronouns (words that replace nouns). They add information about what kind, which one, or how many. City traffi c was terrible last night. The highway was congested for three miles. Two huge old tractor trailers had collided. ■ IDEA JOURNAL Describe — in as much detail as possible — either a person or a room. Language Note: In English, adjectives do not indicate whether the word they modify is singular or plural, unless the adjective is a number. INCORRECT My two new classes are hards . [The adjective two is fi ne because it is a number, but the adjective hard should not end in s .] CORRECT My two new classes are hard . 517 ¡ EDITING ESSAYS 518 Part Five • Other Grammar Concerns Adverbs describe verbs (words that tell what happens in a sentence), adjectives, or other adverbs. They add information about how, how much, when, where, why, or to what extent. Adverbs often end with -ly . MODIFYING VERB Dave drives aggressively . MODIFYING ADJECTIVE The extremely old woman swims every day. MODIFYING ANOTHER ADVERB Dave drives very aggressively. Adjectives usually come before the words they modify; adverbs come either before or after. You can also use more than one adjective or adverb to modify a word. adj adj adj noun verb adv adv The homeless, dirty, old man was talking loudly and crazily to himself. Language Note: Sometimes, students confuse the -ed and -ing forms of adjectives. Common examples are bored/boring, confused/ confusing, excited/exciting , and interested/interesting . Often, the -ed form describes a person’s reaction, while the -ing form describes the thing being reacted to. INCORRECT James is interesting in all sports. [ James isn’t interesting; sports are.] CORRECT James is interested in all sports. [ Is interested describes James’s reaction to sports.] Another common confusion is between when to use an adjective and when to use an adverb. Remember that adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs but not nouns. Adverbs often end in -ly . INCORRECT James is a carefully driver. [The word carefully should not be used to describe a noun, driver . The noun driver should be modifi ed by an adjective, careful . The adverb carefully can be used to modify a verb, drives .] CORRECT James is a careful driver. James drives carefully . ¡ EDITING ESSAYS Chapter 28 • Adjectives and Adverbs 519 Practice Using Adjectives and Adverbs Correctly Choosing between Adjective and Adverb Forms Many adverbs are formed by adding -ly to the end of an adjective. ADJECTIVE ADVERB The new student introduced himself. The couple is newly married....
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This note was uploaded on 01/23/2011 for the course COM 155 taught by Professor Williams during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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com155_Ch28 - 28 Adjectives and Adverbs Describing Which...

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