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paper#3-the concept of race

paper#3-the concept of race - North and white to the South...

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Matt Schillizzi 10/12 “The Concept of Race” Dubois’s writing on “The Concept of Race” profoundly states the feelings he had experienced throughout his life, both in the United States, as well as in Africa. Race was a big issue in his life, and the world for the time period in which he lived in. Obviously, the matter of race oppressed his life while in America, and that was the motivation to leave and start a new life surrounded by the same race. While in the US, Dubois was a neglected scholar, yet remained determined to not let his ancestry interfere with his achievement of goals. So after a move to the South and becoming a member of a closed racial group, he quickly recognized something about race: “Race lines were not fixed and fast.” This led to even more oppression because he was a mulatto. After ridicule of being referred to as a [white] Northerner and not a [black] Southerner, Dubois felt neglected no matter where he lived. He was black to the
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Unformatted text preview: North, and white to the South. He could not fit into any “race” of America. Upon arriving in Africa, Dubois comments on the beauty there, and then segues into the beauty of the culture and the people. He concentrates on the fact that, although Africa may not be as technically advanced as European “races”, the world would learn a lot more by looking to Africa, instead of ignoring it. But Dubois loves it in Africa and did not have any motivation to leave. He reflected on how he lived and was living, and made the metaphor of living in a cave: never being able to leave, never being heard or taken seriously, and if people even noticed him, they only scorned him. And this was all because of race. It seems that unless one if of the majority, never will they be able to live in full potential, and never will they feel belonged....
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