Chapter 5_2post

Chapter 5_2post - Encoding A Basic Model of Memory...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Encoding
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A Basic Model of Memory Long-term or secondary memory Working or Primary Memory Sensory Input Sensory Memory Attention Encoding Retrieval Rehearsal Storage
Background image of page 2
Memory: The Basic Problems How are Memories created? How are Memories Stored and Retained? How are Memories Accessed and Used? Getting it in Keeping it in Using it Encoding Storage Retrieval “Encoding” is really used two ways: the process of stuff getting into long-term memory, and what exactly is happening in primary memory (that results in stuff getting in LTM)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What makes encoding effective? What happens after encoding?
Background image of page 4
Which factors determine what gets into long term memory? Depth of processing Effort/desire to learn Emotion-info is emotional Repetition Congruence-how well it fits with info already stored
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Depth of Processing 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Shallow ("E") Deep ("Size")
Background image of page 6
Maintenance rehearsal refers to recycling information within short-term or working memory. Elaborative rehearsal refers to linking information in short-term memory with information already stored in long-term memory. Organizing Creating visual images Associating info with previous memory/information
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Relational processing refers to how the items to be learned are related to each other and to other items stored in memory. It stresses similarities (e.g., subjective organization). Learning biopsychology Heirarchies Metabolism Subjective organization : remember chunking -personal to that person; organizing info to my own experiences
Background image of page 8
Thinking about meaning “Depth” refers to thinking about meaning, and how the to-be-remembered material relates to things that you already know. Shallow processing means thinking about physical characteristics of the stimulus. Deep processing: “What does ‘cake’ make you think of?” (“a birthday”) deep-meaning Shallow processing: “How many letters are in the word ‘cake’?” (“four”) superficial-shallow Note that there can be degrees of depth.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Level of  processing  Question the  participant must  answer  Sample stimulus  where participant  answers “yes”  Sample stimulus  where participant  answers “no”  Structural  Is the word in  capital letters?  TABLE  Table  Phonemic  Does the word  rhyme with  WEIGHT?  crate  MARKET  Category  Is the word a type  of fish?  SHARK  heaven  Sentence  “He met a _____  in the street.”  FRIEND  cloud  Shallow Deep
Background image of page 10
Results 0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 Structural Phonemic Category Sentence Level of Processing
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Processing information in relation to ourselves provides superior recall of that memory. Examples: psychology courses
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/02/2011 for the course PSYCH 3 taught by Professor Mauldin during the Winter '11 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 63

Chapter 5_2post - Encoding A Basic Model of Memory...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online