Economic Mobility--Is the American Dream Alive and Welll

Economic Mobility--Is the American Dream Alive and Welll -...

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E C O N O M I C M OBILITY : Is the American Dream Alive and Well?
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A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T S A B O U T T H E E C O N O M I C M OBILITY P R O J E C T W ith the convergence of a presidential election cycle, income inequalities last seen nearly a century ago, and emerging new data on the state of mobility in America, the present moment provides a unique opportunity to refocus attention and debate on the question of economic mobility and the American Dream. This report is a product of the Economic Mobility Project. The primary authors of the report were Isabel Sawhill, Ph.D., Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution, and John E. Morton, Director of the Economic Mobility Project at The Pew Charitable Trusts. Extensive research support was provided by a team of Brookings Institution scholars led by Julia Isaacs. Other contributors at Brookings included Ron Haskins, Jeff Tebbs and Emily Roessel. Additional research and editing was provided by The Pew Charitable Trusts staff members Scott Scrivner, Ianna Kachoris, Mona Miller, Jeremy Ratner and Jessica Arnett. All Economic Mobility Project materials are reviewed by members of the Principals’ Group, and guided with input of the project’s Advisory Board (see back cover). The views expressed in this report represent those of the authors and not necessarily of all individuals acknowledged above. The report was designed by Michael Molanphy of Varadero Communications, Inc. The Economic Mobility Project is a unique nonpartisan collaborative effort of The Pew Charitable Trusts and respected thinkers from four leading policy institutes — The American Enterprise Institute, The Brookings Institution, The Heritage Foundation and The Urban Institute. While as individuals they may not necessarily agree on the solutions or policy prescriptions for action, each believes that economic mobility plays a central role in defining the American experience and that more attention must be paid to understanding the status and health of the American Dream. In the months to come, the project will develop new findings, tackle difficult questions such as the role of education, race, gender, and immigration in mobility, and analyze the effects of wealth accumulation and the extent to which short-run fluctuations in income may be affecting mobility. Our purpose is to provoke a more rigorous discussion about the role and strength of economic mobility in American society.
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Economic Mobility Project Recent studies suggest that there is less economic mobility in the United States than has long been presumed. The last thirty years has seen a considerable drop-off in median household income growth compared to earlier generations. And, by some measurements, we are actually a less mobile society than many other nations, includ- ing Canada, France, Germany and most Scandinavian countries. This challenges the notion of America as the land of opportunity.
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course ECO 365 taught by Professor Giederman during the Winter '11 term at Grand Valley State University.

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Economic Mobility--Is the American Dream Alive and Welll -...

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