CJ 350 Policing Lecture (Winter 2011)

CJ 350 Policing Lecture (Winter 2011) - CJ350 Dr.Kierkus...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
    CJ 350 Dr. Kierkus February 2011 Law Enforcement  and  Juvenile Offenders
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    This lecture focuses on citizen and  police responses to juvenile offenders. We will also examine informal juvenile  justice process: that is, efforts by  citizens to handle juvenile crime  without involving the police. Introduction
Background image of page 2
    Youth and the Public: The  Informal Juvenile Justice Process Police contact is typically initiated by citizen  complaint or request for assistance. Citizens exercise  discretion. Suppose you spot a neighborhood boy  vandalizing a neighbor’s house, you can: Ignore or confront the offender yourself. Initiate an informal response (e.g. call the boy’s  parents). Initiate a formal response involving the police.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    The police determine who the vast majority of  formal juvenile justice clients will be. Officers often handle cases informally, which  means prosecutors, judges and correctional  officials never see the youth. The police are the most visible symbol of the  juvenile justice process within the community. How the police respond to juvenile offenders  influences how the community views the juvenile  justice process. Police Response to Juvenile  Offenders
Background image of page 4
    Early policing was  community-based . Officers came from the neighborhoods in which they worked. Walked the beat in these neighborhoods. Relied on informal means of control (from counseling, to  persuasion, to violence). Goal was maintaining order, not necessarily enforcing the law. Primarily reactive. High degree of corruption. Entrepreneurs rather than public servants (citizens who did favors  for the police received better service). Owed allegiance to powerful citizens. Often had a hostile relationship with adolescents (who were “a  problem”).  Few officers mentored youth. The History of Policing Youth
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
    Important changes in the 1900s. Movement toward police professionalism.
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course CJ 350 taught by Professor Kierkus during the Winter '11 term at Grand Valley State University.

Page1 / 19

CJ 350 Policing Lecture (Winter 2011) - CJ350 Dr.Kierkus...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online