Firearms Injury & Death

Firearms Injury & Death - U.S Department of Justice...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
By Marianne W. Zawitz and Kevin J. Strom BJS Statisticians Firearm injuries from crime include those caused by interpersonal violence regardless of whether the injured party was the intended target or even a perpetrator. Such injuries can be fatal (homicides) or nonfatal (assaults). Incidents resulting in firearm injury may involve other crimes like robbery and burglary but are referred to as assaults. While injuries other than gunshot wounds can result from crimes involv- ing a firearm, this report focuses on gunshot wounds. No single source of data completely measures firearm injury and deaths from crime. Several sources cover only fatalities while others cover nonfatal injury. For example, the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) does not include data about victims who died. In addition, while the NCVS provides a wealth of information about crime and victims, it does not capture enough cases involving gunshot wounds to provide annual estimates of many of the characteristics of such events. Hospital emergency department surveillance systems are able to collect additional cases and details about victims of nonfatal gunshot wounds but do not collect information about victims who do not seek treatment in hospitals (about 20% of all victims of nonfatal gunshot wounds, according to the NCVS). To describe firearm injury and death from crime, this report uses data from victim surveys, hospital emergency departments, death certificates, and law enforcement reports on homicides. (See the box on page 5 and the Methodology for additional discussion of sources of data concerning firearm injury.) How much crime involves firearms and gunshot wounds? The BJS National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) data for 1993-97 show that of the 19.2 million incidents of nonfatal violent crime, excluding simple assault — 28% were committed with a firearm 4% were committed with a firearm and resulted in injury less than 1% resulted in gunshot wounds. Of serious nonfatal violent victimiza- tions, 28% were committed with a firearm, 4% were committed with a firearm and resulted in injury, and less than 1% resulted in gunshot wounds. Of all nonfatal firearm-related injuries treated in emergency depart- ments, 62% were known to have resulted from an assault. For firearm- related fatalities, 44% were homicides. The number of gunshot wounds from assaults treated in hospital emergency departments fell from 64,100 in 1993 to 39,400 in 1997, a 39% decline. Homicides committed with a firearm fell from 18,300 in 1993 to 13,300 in 1997, a 27% decline. Four out of five of the victims of both fatal and nonfatal gunshot wounds from crime were male. Almost half of the victims of both fatal and nonfatal gunshot wounds from crime were black males. About a quarter were black males ages 15 to 24. Over half the victims of nonfatal
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 8

Firearms Injury & Death - U.S Department of Justice...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online