Chapter6 - IIIA Occupational Segregation Patterns Click to...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style IIIA Occupational Segregation Patterns Explanations Segregation & Earnings
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Obj10 http://www.dol.gov/wb/factsheets/20lead2008.htm http://www.dol.gov/wb/factsheets/nontra2008.htm
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I. Patterns blue collar jobs still mostly male example: production jobs, craft jobs (carpenters, electricians), transportation related jobs, garbage collectors, construction workers. historically, involve hostile work environment pink collar jobs clerical/service became mostly female by 1970s only 3 occupations had noticeable gains in male representations: cooks, kitchen workers, house servants
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% of BA degrees awarded to women
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% of MA degrees awarded to women
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Obj104 big increases in female representation but segregation within professions
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women well-represented at entry and mid-level but few are top corporate officers 12.5% in 2000 % of female law firm associates : 42% in 2000 % of female law firm partners: 16% in 2000 discrimination or tough choices (women opting out of "fast track" careers and pursuing work-family balance)? 2000: about 30% MBAs went to women at top schools some years later only a small % working starting salary same, 7 years later earn 40% less
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March 2002 GAO study male and female managers 1995 earnings ratio: .83 2000 earnings ratio: .62
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% female, gender earnings ratio, median weekly earnings, 2004
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patterns women in “male” occupations make less than comparable men men in “female” occupations more likely to rise to top (top dogs) education sector (librarians) nursing (glass escalator)
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Obj106
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do women “choose” to work in lower paying jobs? why?
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Chapter6 - IIIA Occupational Segregation Patterns Click to...

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