KinLecture3 i missed

KinLecture3 i missed - Biomechanics Examples of Research in...

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Unformatted text preview: Biomechanics Examples of Research in Biomechanics What is the most effective method of executing a turn in swimming? What is the most effective design for a running shoe? When designing a prosthetic device, what design characteristics will help the device function most like a human limb? Why do female athletes suffer from ACL injuries more than male athletes? How can a cycling helmet be diesigned to best reduce wind resistance? How can an understanding of the physics of human movement help solve crimes? o Example: Was the person pushed or did they fall? How can an understanding of the physics of human movement help create more realistic animation? o Example: Movies and video games What is biomechanics? Study of biological systems from a mechanical perspective o Mechanics branch of physics involving analysis of the actions of forces. Consists of 2 branches: Statics study of systems in a state of constant motion Dynamics study of systems subject to acceleration Basic Anatomical Concepts Planes and axes of motion Anatomical directional terminology Fundamental movements Insertion versus Origin Concentric, Eccentric & Isometric Contraction Basic Anatomical Concepts: Insertion vs. Origin Insertion the distal attachment or the part that attaches farthest from the midline of the body (also the most movable part) Origin the proximal attachment of a muscle or the part that attaches closest to the midline of the body (also the least movable part) o Example: Biceps brachii has its origin on the scapula (least movable bone) and its insertion on the radius (most movable bone) Basic Anatomical Concepts: Concentric, Eccentric & Isometric Concentric: muscle develops tension as it shortens and occurs when the muscle develops enough force to overcome the applied resistance Eccentric: muscle is lengthening under tension and occurs when the muscle gradually lessens in tension to control the descent of the resistance Isometric: muscle develops tension but does not change length Basic Concepts of Biomechanics: Kinematics & Kinetics Kinematics the study of motion without considering forces and...
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course KIN 101 taught by Professor Jung during the Spring '11 term at ASU.

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KinLecture3 i missed - Biomechanics Examples of Research in...

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