Week7-1

Week7-1 - Hayes Introductory Linguistics p 284 Chapter 10...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hayes Introductory Linguistics p. 284 Chapter 10: Phonetics 1. Phonetic description Linguists who take on a never-studied language seldom start with quantifier scope! The first task is to be able to hear the language and take down utterances. It’s a familiar experience for everyone to have heard a foreign language as mere sound—it seems to go by very fast, and is hard to imitate and remember. Indeed, it will typically be the case that a language will contain crucial distinctions between sounds that escape the linguist entirely in his first few efforts. Thus, it’s a fundamental skill of linguists to be able to listen to other languages with a trained ear; to take down what is said accurately in a phonetic transcription. Such transcription is taught to beginning linguists all over the world, including in a full one-quarter course at UCLA. 100 Here is an example of transcription: [ ˈ ð ɪ s ɪ z ə f əˈ n ɛɾɪ k t ɹ aen ˈ skr ɪ p ʃə n ə v ə n ˈɪŋ gl ɪʃ ˈ s ɛ ntn s p ɹəˈ na ʊ nst ɪ n ma ɪ ˈ o ʊ n ˈ da ɪə l ɛ kt] (This is a phonetic transcription of an English sentence pronounced in my own dialect.) 2. The International Phonetic Alphabet The standard form of phonetic transcription is the International Phonetic Alphabet , a large symbol set promulgated by the International Phonetic Association (both the alphabet and the association may be abbreviated “IPA”). This is the form of transcription that will be taught in this course. The Association offers much information, either free or inexpensive, on its Alphabet and how to use it: Their printed guide, Handbook of the International Phonetic Association : A Guide to the Use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (Cambridge University Press, and UCLA libraries) The IPA website: http://www.langsci.ucl.ac.uk/ipa/ The IPA’s free sound files from many languages: http://web.uvic.ca/ling/resources/ipa/handbook.htm The IPA phonetic chart, which, despite the continuing discovery of new sounds, still fits on just one page. Below, I’ve split it up for greater legibility. 100 Linguistics 103, offered every quarter.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hayes Introductory Linguistics p. 285
Background image of page 2
Hayes Introductory Linguistics p. 286
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hayes Introductory Linguistics p. 287 It would not be reasonable to ask you to learn the entire IPA chart in an introductory linguistics course, but I’ve included it just to show what is needed to cover (most of) the world’s languages. 101 Given the very brief time available, the only language that we will cover will be American English. This is actually a rather complex language phonetically, and once you have it down, it makes transcribing the others easier. 3. Vowel and consonant charts for English The following are charts, based on the IPA chart, giving just the vowels and consonants of English: 101 The IPA is revised and improved from time to time, but still needs work. For instance, it still lacks symbols for the sounds Romanized as pp , tt , and kk in Korean.
Background image of page 4
Hayes Introductory Linguistics p. 288
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 10

Week7-1 - Hayes Introductory Linguistics p 284 Chapter 10...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online