smallest_planet

smallest_planet - Smallest planet is nearly Earth-sized -...

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Rocky Kepler-10b (at bottom in this illustration) is too close to its host star to support life as we know it (Image: NASA) Enlarge image Astronomers have found the smallest planet outside our solar system yet. The alien world is just 1.4 times as wide as Earth, but it is far too hot to host life as we know it. NASA's Kepler space telescope detected the planet, called Kepler-10b, indirectly by observing how it regularly dimmed its parent star when it passed between the star and Earth. The amount of dimming indicates that the planet is 1.4 times the width of Earth, making it smaller than the previous record holder, COROT-7b , which is about 1.7 times Earth's size. The team used ground-based telescopes to observe the wobble that the planet gravitationally induces in its parent star. That revealed that the planet is 4.6 times as massive as Earth. Rocky world Its density is about 8.8 times that of water, meaning it must be made mostly of rock and metal, like Earth. COROT-7b may well be a rocky world, too. It has the same density as Earth – about 5.5 times that of
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smallest_planet - Smallest planet is nearly Earth-sized -...

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