Unit1 - Reading Choices: Unit One, Lesson One Welcome to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Reading Choices: Unit One, Lesson One • Welcome to the first Unit of English 227: Introduction to World Fiction. By now you should be familiar with the environment. Let’s begin the class in earnest now.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This class is about studying fiction. How do you feel about that? – Interested? Comfortable? Apprehensive? Skeptical? Your response probably comes from your identity as a reader. Student reading is often driven by assignments and deadlines. You do what you can to survive. Try to put that aside for a moment.
Background image of page 2
Why do you read? What do you read? • Most of us read all the time so we may not even think about it as we do it. • We read for practical reasons. We read signs, instructions, directions, menus, forms, text messages, email, and so on. • We read to get specific information. We look up words in the dictionary or try to find a phone number. We cruise the internet, comb reference books, and pick up text books to learn. • We read newspapers, magazines, blogs, graphic novels, and of course, books.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What are your preferences? • Some people are drawn to non-fiction. Biographies, histories, memoirs, and essays, are popular choices. “Subject based” texts such as those about computers or “how to” books are also favorites. – Non-fiction readers are often looking for “real life” or something practical and tangible. • Some people are drawn to fiction (the focus of this course). Maybe they like a specific kind of story, or author, or genre. – Fiction readers often look for escape: to get lost in a story and in the characters’ lives.
Background image of page 4
Readers of all kinds can get frustrated with the process Why does this matter? It is all make-believe anyway. Why do we have to pick this apart? It ruins the story. Fiction can teach us about real life. Analyzing literature can open newfound depths in the text and in ourselves. It gets easier with practice.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Survival Tips • Only you know how fast you read and how well you comprehend. Pace yourself accordingly. To be successful and comfortable you will need to complete the reading. • Preview the syllabus so that if you need to you can get a head start on some of the larger assignments. • Don’t read passively. Take notes (ideally right in the text itself). Underline important passages, keep track of details and your reactions. • Participate in discussions and ask questions.
Background image of page 6
Reading is Action • “Reading doesn’t just happen to you; you have to do it, and doing it involves decision, reaching out, discovery, awareness” (Beaty xi). • “Reading is an act of power, and learning how to get the most out of its possibilities can be an invigorating activity. For all of its association with quietness, solitude, and the sedentary life, reading involves---at its deepest level---action and interaction” (Beaty xi).
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“The Zebra Storyteller” Read Spencer Holst’s story in your anthology. There is a suggestion that a story
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 32

Unit1 - Reading Choices: Unit One, Lesson One Welcome to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online