Unit5 - Symbols and Imagery:Unit Five, Lesson One In this...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Symbols and Imagery:Unit Five, Lesson One • In this unit we will be studying symbolism and figurative language. • A symbol expands meaning. It bridges “the gap between the writer’s vision and the reader’s” (Beaty 186).
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Definition A symbol “creates a direct merging of (1) a specific object, scene, character, or action and (2) ideas, values, persons, or ways of life. In effect, a symbol is a substitute for the elements being signified, much as the flag stands for the ideals of the nation” (Roberts 137).
Background image of page 2
Two Types of Symbols Cultural symbols “[E]mbody ideas and emotions that writers and readers share as heirs of the same historical and cultural tradition” (Roberts 138). Generally or universally recognized Often allude to other works from our culture (books,art,politics, history, current events, etc.) Contextual symbols Can be symbols “ only if they are made so within individual works (Roberts 139). Meaning comes from the context of the work. “If the element is prominent and also maintains a consistency of meaning, you can justify interpreting it as a symbol” (Roberts 139).
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
School pride and rivalry UW mascot, fierce, territorial Animal Badger Honor Royalty Color Purple Sentiment Love Flower Red rose Fidelity, love, loyalty State of being married Gold band on left hand Wedding Ring Possible Emotions Meaning, Level 2 Meaning, Level 1 Symbol “Universal” Symbols (Myers-Shaffer 225)
Background image of page 4
Identifying Symbols • Beaty reminds us that something becomes a symbol “only when its potentially symbolic meaning is confirmed by something else in the story” (186). • Our instinct and experience come into play. When we first encounter a symbol, it may seem to convey more meaning or be given more weight than usual. That complexity is an important cue. • Details can be identified as symbols through direct and indirect hints.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Indirect and Direct Hints Indirect hints Repetition doesn’t guarantee that something is a symbol. – It is a “heads up,” however. It calls attention to detail and possibility. If the repetition seems significant and if there is a potential for layered meaning, then it is worth investigation. • Direct hints • Explicit statements. • If the detail doesn’t seem to make literal sense by itself, it may stand for something else (Beaty 187).
Background image of page 6
• The more ideas that you can associate with a particular detail, the more likely it is to be a symbol. – This is related to what Beaty is talking about when he refers to “exhaustion.” Symbols are filled with meaning---layered, elusive meaning that can’t be reduced to a formula: This=this. • Remember to always check your associations with the rest of text and “common sense.” Explore and push, but not at the expense of rationality. – As Freud said, “Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar.”
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 31

Unit5 - Symbols and Imagery:Unit Five, Lesson One In this...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online