Lecture%2013 - Lecture 13: Kant, day 2 March 7, 2011 Click...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 4/4/11 Lecture 13: Kant, day 2 March 7, 2011
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4/4/11 In the Future Read Kant’s Grounding , Second Section: Pages,19-27, Paragraphs # 1-23
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4/4/11 Review In the previous class, I argued that the core idea of Kant’s moral philosophy is EQUALITY. We have a concern for equality when we govern our actions by a principle that says, “Only perform those actions that all other rational beings endorse and also perform.” Kant then argued that this fundamental principle of morality comes from reason: we cannot discover right and wrong and the morally foundational principle of equality from our empirical investigations of human culture. Even if the impulse to treat people equally and with respect comes from our evolutionary development: this does not tell us WHY we OUGHT to treat people that way when we have no impulse to do so.
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4/4/11 Argument that as rational beings our purpose is more than happiness 1. Let us assume that natural beings have capacities for a purpose and that their capacities direct them towards their natural ends/goals. 2. If happiness is our goal and all that reason does is calculate the means to our happiness, then we are mistakes of nature . 3. This is because reason is not the best way to achieve happiness: mere instinct would work more effectively. Because reason often tells us to go against our own happiness, whereas instinct would lead us always towards happiness. 1. Assumption: We are not satisfied with saying either that reason is useless or that we are mistakes of nature. 2. If reason is to be regarded as uniquely human, and its goal does not seem to be happiness, then we must consider that we have an aim/goal that is different than happiness. 3. What reason does do uniquely is “produce a will good in itself.”
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4/4/11 Good will = Acting from a sense of duty The notion of “acting from a sense of duty” will help us to understand what it means to be a person of good will and one who does what is morally right FOR THE RIGHT REASONS. Consider a person who is doing what is right (treating people
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Lecture%2013 - Lecture 13: Kant, day 2 March 7, 2011 Click...

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