Lecture11 - Lecture12:Aquinason Virtue October4,2010

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 4/4/11 Click to edit Master subtitle style Lecture 12: Aquinas on  Virtue October 4, 2010
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 4/4/11 Begin reading KANT: Preface: Pages 1-5, Paragraphs # 4,  7 to 9, 11 to 13; First Section: Pages 7-12 Paragraphs # 1  to 13 In the Future
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 4/4/11 1. Natural moral law is given to all persons, through reason, and  cannot be removed from people’s hearts. Rejection of Plato’s elitism (the good is only truly known by the  philosophers) 2. Natural law is teleological, like Plato, and that final end is  happiness for both. But they conceive of “happiness”  differently: Plato’s is natural, Aquinas’ is non-natural  (transcendent). 3. Both appreciate the power of reason, but Aquinas gives us an  actual set of principles as innate and self-evident within us. Review and Comparison to Plato
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 4/4/11 5. Aquinas argues that the political (human) law should only  outlaw/regulate those vices that harm others and that most  can refrain from: it should not regulate everything that  morality says (outlaw all vices). Law should not prescribe that individuals be perfectly virtuous. Plato seems to want a State that forces everyone to be virtuous.  6. Aquinas regards a moral person to be one whose WILL is  acting on the right principles and so acting to achieve the  COMMON GOOD. Plato regards the moral person as one who has “inner harmony” Review and Comparison to Plato
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A. Only the most wise persons can understand true  goodness (what is right and wrong) and it is more  important that everyone who cannot grasp right/wrong  merely follow those norms rather than have the freedom  to try and discover and choose what is right.  Many just  do not have that ability or insight and so society (and  those persons) are better off just being RULED  coercively. B.
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2011 for the course PHIL 105 taught by Professor Ruckgarber during the Spring '10 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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Lecture11 - Lecture12:Aquinason Virtue October4,2010

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