WK8_SOC2460_SP11 - SOC 2460: Drugs and Society Spring, 2011...

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SOC 2460: Drugs and Society Spring, 2011 Mondays and Wednesdays 2:30-3:20, 253 Malott Hall Discussion Sections on Fridays (1) 2:30PM-3:20PM MCG 125 (2) 2:30PM-3:20PM MRL 111 (3) 1:25PM-2:15PM MRL 111 (4) 10:10AM-11:00AM MCG 125 Instructor: Douglas Heckathorn, Professor of Sociology 344 Uris Hall 55 368 255-4368 E-mail: ddh22@cornell.edu Office Hours: Fridays 1:30 to 3:30 or by appointment eaching Assistants: Teaching Assistants: Patrick Park Kyle Albert
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Gender and Drugs he ideal of gender equality is now widely accepted The ideal of gender equality is now widely accepted – Exceptions are treated as unusual, e.g., Christian and Islamic fundamentalists – Women are moving increasingly into the most rewarding and restigious professions such as medicine and law where both medical prestigious professions, such as medicine and law, where both medical and law school classes are nearly equally balanced between male and female students – Progress has been slower in physical sciences and skilled trades owhere in the US can one find a more gender gressive Nowhere in the US can one find a more gender-regressive environment that the drug trade Why gender inequality in the drug trade? – Lack of means for enforcing contracts may lead to resort to violence In Adler’s Wheeling and Dealing, an ethnography of top tier drug dealers, she notes a disproportionate number of males 6’2” or larger – Her interpretation—that being physically intimidating is helpful Carrying a gun is not an adequate substitute, because effective sanctions are incremental; and resort to arms is hazardous for all parties involved 2
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Gender and Drugs According to Chitwood, exploitation of women reaches a nadir in crack houses where sex is traded for drugs – Each dose of crack is cheap (often only $5 to $10), but given that high is brief (5 to 10 minutes) and a run can last 3-4 days, cost of staying high can be very large, e.g., about $3K/day When money for drugs is gone, crack users may do what they had not previous contemplated – For males this can mean high-risk crimes, e.g., smash and grab Women are more likely to have the opportunity to trade sex for drugs yp p y g – This is especially likely because crack is seen as an aphrodisiac, and in any case reduces inhibitations – According to Chitwood, greatest exploitation of women occurs in brothels where pay is drugs and junk food py g j – This is one of the worst stereotypes; but one that also occurs A problem with understanding relationship between gender and drugs—most research has focused on men aving less that 25% females in any federal study requires special Having less that 25% females in any federal study requires special justification – For this reason, some small group research employs only women – In injector studies, reaching the 25% threshold is hard, because the 3 percentage of female injectors is smaller, usually about 10% and seldom more than 20% – Consequently equivalents of affirmative action are used (quota samples, steering incentives)
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Gender and Drugs
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WK8_SOC2460_SP11 - SOC 2460: Drugs and Society Spring, 2011...

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