Lecture 20 Sakai

Lecture 20 Sakai - Lecture 20 Lecture 15 November 2010...

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Lecture 20 Lecture 20 15 November 2010 15 November 2010
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Contraction of Skeletal Muscle
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Contraction of Skeletal Muscle In an isometric contraction, overall muscle length does not shorten. Internally, shortening of the contractile component is accompanied by lengthening of the series elastic component. Tension develops as the elastic component is lengthened.
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Contraction of Skeletal Muscle Contraction can be isometric (same length) or isotonic (same force). In vivo, most contractions are “hybrids”, involve force development with some change in length. Isometric Isotonic
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Length – Tension Curve Note the distinction between active and passive tension. Active tension from contraction; passive tension from external stretching.
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Length – Tension Curve The extent of overlap of thick and thin filaments determines the force producing capability of a muscle.
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Contraction of Skeletal Muscle Contraction can be isometric (same length) or isotonic (same force). In vivo, most contractions are “hybrids”, involve force development with some change in length. Isometric Isotonic Note that the latent period is longer in an isotonic than in an isometric contraction. In vivo, concentric contractions involve force production with shortening. Eccentric contractions involve force production with lengthening.
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Isotonic contractions require force development prior to
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2011 for the course BIO 704:360 taught by Professor John-alder during the Fall '11 term at Rutgers.

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Lecture 20 Sakai - Lecture 20 Lecture 15 November 2010...

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