ch7maleolympians

ch7maleolympians - Classics 10: Chapter 7: Spring 2010...

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Classics 10: Chapter 7: Spring 2010 Myths of the Olympians II: The Male Deities I. Poseidon, Lord of the Deep II. Apollo the Far-Darter, God of Prophecy III. Hephaestus, God of Smiths IV. Ares, Incarnation of Blood Lust V. Hermes, Trickster God of Wayfarers FIRST EXAM ON MONDAY
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First Exam: Monday, April 19 70 Multiple Choice Questions in 50 minutes (33% of final grade) Bring UCD 2000 Scantron Form and #2 pencil; arrive early if possible Blue scantron, smaller than sheet of paper 220 students in 200 seats 3 different versions of exam; each distributed to every third seat Any suspected cheating will be submitted to Student Judicial Affairs for arbitration
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Priorities for Studying 1. Lecture Power Points: all names, terms, concepts, periods (except the visual art) Primary source for exam questions = the things I particularly emphasize in lecture 2. Key Names and Terms listed at the end of each chapter in the textbook 3. Other names and terms in the textbook
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Anthropomorphism Gods are humanshaped and humanlike A likely inheritance from Near Eastern traditions (but not as prominent in Rome) They feast, pay honor, seduce, marry, have families, fight (and get wounded) They are NOT always well behaved They are emotional: love, hate, scheming
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Anthropomorphism The gods are like us, only greater Anthropomorphism makes interesting narrative and great myths Gives myths expressive power Myths = stories of gods, they do not require belief or determine behavior Complexity of Olympian behavior = a reflection of our desire to understand the place of the human in the world
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Male Deities Reflect range of activities consistent with the roles Greek men played in their society Model of positive qualities: good looks, courage, appropriate action Yet they also get drunk, lust, fight They control men yet they are the reflection of men
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Exclusively Male Roles (and their divine overseer) Heads of families (Zeus) Purveyors of higher knowledge (Apollo) Sailors (Poseidon) Blacksmiths (Hephaestus) Soldiers (Ares) Bankers, merchants (Hermes)
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I. Poseidon, Lord of the Deep Once an Indo-European male fertility god? Would explain the tangle of his competencies: original: springs, horses, earthquakes acquired: saltwater (Mediterranean) sea “Shaker of the Earth”; master of terrifying movement; dangerous, unpredictable god Married to Amphitrite father of the merman Triton, who blows his conch shell to calm the sea
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Poseidon, Lord of the Deep Greeks distrustful of the sea But their food and commerce depended on it
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2011 for the course CLA 10 taught by Professor Traill during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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ch7maleolympians - Classics 10: Chapter 7: Spring 2010...

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