ch18part2medeatroy

ch18part2medeatroy - Classics 10: Chapters 18 and 19:...

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Classics 10: Chapters 18 and 19: Spring 2010 Jason and Medea; Prelude to the Trojan War I. Jason and Medea in Greece II. Medea and the Dragon-Wagon (at left) III. The House of Atreus IV. Prelude to the Trojan War
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Chapter Eighteen, Part 2 Jason and Medea in Greece
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The Return of Jason Jason returns in triumph to Iolcus with the Golden Fleece and presents it to King Pelias Pelias refuses to yield power to Jason (which he was supposed to do if he got the Fleece?) Medea tricks Pelias’ daughters into killing him She chops up an old ram, cooks him, and a young ram climbs out of the pot Medea promises the same for Pelias, so his daughters kill him and chop him up Medea cooks him … but he remains a human stew Medea’s schemes are powerful and dangerous
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The Death of Pelias Oracle that Jason would cause Pelias’ death thus turns out to be true People of Iolcus shocked Jason and Medea banished They go to Corinth
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Jason and Medea in Corinth Jason and Medea live happily in Corinth for a while – have two sons Jason then chooses to dump Medea and marry the daughter of King Creon No relation to King Creon of Thebes Jason says that Medea can stay in Corinth with him and his new wife, and in fact his marriage within the royal family will provide better resources to raise his two sons by Medea (!)
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Euripides’ Medea (431 BCE) Perhaps the most shocking of all Greek tragedies; very powerful in its rhetoric Play begins with Medea complaining of Jason’s decision to dump her She is dangerously upset She feels that all his accomplishments were only because of her aid First part of play develops sympathy for Medea: what is she to do now?
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Euripides’ Medea (431 BCE) Medea makes a feminist appeal to the women of Corinth “We women are the most unfortunate of creatures” Marriage is a trap: we women get no freedom while the men get to do what they want Men think they are strong but women are “Better to fight three times in battle than to feel the pain of bearing one child” All she asks is that they not stop her from seeking revenge on her unfaithful husband
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Euripides’ Medea (431 BCE) Medea and Jason have a huge fight on-stage Medea calls him a weak coward who would have failed without her He is breaking his marriage oath Jason calls her a sex-crazed witch who he was kind enough to rescue from Colchis She should be happy she got to be with him at all, esp. in “civilized” Greece Men would be happier without women, if only there as some other way to have kids
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Euripides’ Medea (431 BCE) King Creon hears of Medea’s call for revenge and banishes her She pleads with him to give her one last day Aegeus, King of Athens, visits Corinth Medea learns of his childlessness, promises to use magic to make him fertile He promises in return that he will welcome her to Athens NO MATTER WHAT Medea now has somewhere to go and one day to enact her vengeance on Jason and his wife
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ch18part2medeatroy - Classics 10: Chapters 18 and 19:...

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