ch20falltroy

Ch20falltroy - Classics 10 Chapter 20 Spring 2010 The Fall of Troy and Its Aftermath I Troy After Achilles II The Trojan Horse III The Fall of Troy

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Classics 10: Chapter 20: Spring 2010 The Fall of Troy and Its Aftermath I. Troy After Achilles II. The Trojan Horse III. The Fall of Troy IV. The Return of Agamemnon The Death of Laocoön, ca. 100 BCE
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Troy After Achilles Stories of Trojan War told by other epic poets around Homer’s Iliad These poems are called the Epic Cycle, only fragments and summaries of them survive The Fall of Troy recounted in full by the Roman poet Virgil (20 BCE) Aeneas the only Trojan prince to survive, he will found the Roman race; and how he does so is the story of the Virgil’s Aeneid More on the Aeneid two lectures from now
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Troy After Achilles The Trojan War resumes in full force after the death of Hector, in its tenth (and final) year The Amazons arrive to help the Trojans, led by their queen Penthesilea As Achilles kills her, their eyes meet … Achilles soon after killed by an arrow from Paris in his heel (Achilles’ heel = symbol of weak spot) How exactly this arrow was fatal is not clear, but Paris seems to have had help from Apollo Did Thetis dip Achilles in the river Styx? (Homer: no) The Iliad makes it clear that Achilles is to die soon
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The Arms of Achilles Ajax (son of Telamon, also called Greater Ajax), likely the best of the Greek warriors after Achilles, saves Achilles’ body Achilles is given a great funeral and his ashes placed with those of Patroclus His divine armor to be awarded to the next best warrior after him Odysseus gives a better speech than Ajax and persuades the Greeks to judge him best Ajax, humiliated, goes crazy
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Sophocles’ Ajax (ca. 441 BCE) Ajax decides to kill Agamemnon, Menelaus and Odysseus in retaliation He goes and does so, only then to discover that he had gone mad and had been killing sheep while thinking the sheep were the Greek heroes Now doubly humiliated, and his violent intentions clear, he kills himself by falling on his sword
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The Suicide of Ajax Attic jug, ca. 530 BCE Note how he has removed his own armor to be his witness Otherwise all alone and resolute on death before further dishonor The only such heroic suicide in Greek myth
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Further Adventures After Achilles Odysseus sneaks into Troy disguished as a beggar in order to steal a statue of Athena This supposed to win over Athena to the Greeks’ side Achilles’ son Neoptolemus comes to fight in place of his father Philoctetes, who had been left on the island of Lemnos with an odd disease, is cured and brought to Troy His bow = the bow of Heracles, and with it Philoctetes kills Paris Yet the Greeks still cannot decisively win the war
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The Trojan Horse Odysseus comes up with the strategy of the Trojan Horse He has a huge wooden horse built, big enough to hide 50 men inside it (compare Jason’s 50 Argonauts) The rest of the Greeks pretend they are giving up
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2011 for the course CLA 10 taught by Professor Traill during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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Ch20falltroy - Classics 10 Chapter 20 Spring 2010 The Fall of Troy and Its Aftermath I Troy After Achilles II The Trojan Horse III The Fall of Troy

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