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ch23lecearlyrome - Classics 10: Chapter 23: Spring 2010...

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Classics 10: Chapter 23: Spring 2010 Legends of Early Rome [Course Evaluations] [The Aeneid of Virgil (end)] Livy on Rome’s Origins: Romulus Final Exam = Monday, 6-8pm
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Course Evaluations For Question 10, please answer the following two questions: 1. How effective did you find my teaching in this course? Why? 2. What changes would improve the value of the course?
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Final Exam: Monday, 6-8pm Same format and weight as first two exams, bring UCD 2000 Scantron Form and #2 pencil Chapters 16-23 ONLY (not cumulative) Even coverage: 6-8 questions per chapter, most from lecture A few questions on exam specifically from book (i.e., from Key Names and Terms) Know Key Names, flow of each story as presented in lecture Read questions carefully, as I will write them carefully Any suspected cheating will be submitted to Student Judicial Affairs for arbitration
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The Aeneid of Virgil (continued) The Aeneid is an epic poem, Homeric in inspiration but nationalistic in tone Virgil draws upon a Greek myth and a Homeric form to declare what he thinks is the essence of the Roman achievement Homer is an oral performer, Virgil a learned poet Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey are about the greatest questions for an individual, while Virgil’s Aeneid is about the greatest questions for his whole nation What is Rome’s mission? How does its founder embody that mission? Has Rome lived up to it?
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Virgil and Roman Historical Identity Virgil begins work on the Aeneid right when Caesar Augustus effectively ended the Republican period and began designing a new system of government in which he rules as an emperor He tells the story of Aeneas, who survives the Trojan War, wanders the Mediterranean, and then settles in Italy to found the Roman race It is a historical myth told in epic poetry, and very much about Roman origins and Roman identity Aeneas starts out a Trojan and has to become a Roman, and the price of that change of identity is very high The costs of progress always prominent in the poem
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The Second Half of the Aeneid The first half of the poem (Books 1-6) develops Aeneas from a loser Trojan into the Romano- inspired warrior capable of fighting his way to the founding of the Roman race in the second half of the poem (Books 7-12) He and his Trojans form a bridgehead on the Italian coast, ally with the Latins, but end up having to fight the other Italian peoples It is a sort of civil war, in that Aeneas kills many of the people amongst whom he will live when the war is over Many overtones in Books 7-12 of Rome’s recent civil wars, a darker feel to the second half
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The Aeneid : Book 12 Skipping to near the end, Jupiter and Juno arrange a truce: Aeneas will win the war and found the Latin race, but the Trojan race will be absorbed into the Latin race The poem then ends with Aeneas in one-on-one combat with the Italian enemy champion (and Juno’s champion): Turnus They also fight for the hand of the daughter of King Latinus
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2011 for the course CLA 10 taught by Professor Traill during the Spring '08 term at UC Davis.

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ch23lecearlyrome - Classics 10: Chapter 23: Spring 2010...

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