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VGLII progect part 1 - Report on VGLI I Exercise In t ro to...

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Report on VGLII Exercise, Intro to Biology Project By: Stephanie Lennon Worked with: Olivia vonNieda, and Kasey Francica April 6, 2010 Abstract The Virtual Genetics Lab II was used to analyze different phenotypes of theoretical dragonflies and to determine the mode of inheritance of each trait and allele. The analysis showed that both traits were autosomal. Upon further inquiry, it was found that the green antenna color was autosomal dominant, six legs were autosomal dominant, red antenna color was autosomal recessive and one leg was autosomal recessive. Introduction The purpose of this experiment was to analyze two different traits of theoretical dragonflies using VGLII program and to determine whether each allele was autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, co-dominant or sex-linked. Materials and Methods Virtual Genetics Lab II software version 2.0.2 was used in this experiment. The particular program was Spring2010Project.pr2. This was saved as a work file called SpringProject.wr2. It was attempted to isolate each trait in order to examine one trait at a time. Crosses and test-crosses were performed. Images of the cages were captured by using the PrtSc function, and pasted into this word document. The chi-square table from pre-lab activity “Making Predictions and Analyzing Data from Genetic Crosses” from the FlyLab Simulation Lab was used to verify predictions. Results Figure 1 shows the initial cage of theoretical dragonflies.
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Figure 1. Theoretical dragonflies produced by VGLII 2.0.2. Two traits are shown with two different alleles. The traits and alleles are: antenna color: green or red, and number of legs: six or one. Part 1: Locating homozygous dominant and recessive individuals First, a green one-legged male and a green one-legged female were crossed. Their offspring were then crossed. The results are shown in Figure 2. Figure 2. The cross of the F 2 generation of the original cross. The F 2 generation yielded only green one-legged individuals, it can be concluded that these offspring are inbred. Second, a red one-legged male and a green one-legged female were crossed. Their offspring were then crossed. The results are shown in Figure 3.
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Figure 3. The cross of the F 2 generation of the original cross of red one-legged individuals.
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