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c161l3_09_08 - Chemical vs Physical Changes A process...

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Chemical vs. Physical Changes Chemical vs. Physical Changes W A process changes the composition of a material is a chemical change W Examples Boiling water (physical) Burning gasoline (chemical)
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Mixtures Mixtures W Combination of two or more substances is a mixture W Can be separated physically W Heterogeneous - different substances discerned by the naked eye Sand Granite Milk smog W Homogeneous - substances uniformly dispersed sugar water alloys air
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Separation techniques Separation techniques W Precipitation W Crystallization W Distillation W Filtration W Chromatography
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Chapter 2 Chapter 2 Atoms, Molecules, and Ions
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Conservation of Mass and Conservation of Mass and Law of Definite Proportions Law of Definite Proportions W Matter can neither be created nor destroyed Kinds of matter (elements) can’t even be changed Arrangement can W The basic units of matter can only combine in simple ratios W Mass percentage is one way to express the ratio
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Laws of Composition Laws of Composition W
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