Final A key

Final A key - Mic 102 Fall 10 Final Exam8 December 2010...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Mic 102 Fall 10 Final Exam—8 December 2010 This exam is to represent only your own work . As a UC Davis student, you are bound by an honor code; if you can’t be trusted with that, can you be trusted in a career in, say, the health professions? Not only does this honor code demand personal integrity, but it also requires you to demand integrity from your peers. This exam is closed book, closed note. Please hand in a blue scantron with your answers; you may keep the exam. Make sure that it has your name, student I.D.#, and Test form A ” filled in. In this class, you’ve spent the quarter learning about the diversity of the microbial world in general terms, but also learning the specific details about one specific organism for a group project. Reading the results of your research, I have learned a lot of interesting things—and I thank you for bringing them to my attention. So, rather than giving you more questions about Roseobacter (there are several Roseobacter genomes sequenced, and it lives symbiotically with some interesting eukaryotes—it was quite an interesting exam), I’ll give you a chance to see what your classmates have been working on. For question 9: micrograph of cross section of a Frankia alni nitrogen-fixing compartment. Scale bar = 0.05 um.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
For question 35: A micrograph of Shewanella oneidensis . The dark particles are insoluble iron oxides; the strings of iron oxides are coating protein filaments. For question 36: A comparison of the genomes of Shewanella and Vibrio. Each dot represents a gene common to both organisms.
Background image of page 2
1. Acanthamoeba is is a eukaryotic microorganism found in pond water. It lacks a cell wall. It is a heterotroph, and makes is living by phagocytosing much smaller bacteria and eukaryotic microbes. It produces trehalose (an osmoprotectant) and has a contractile vacuole; these features are necessary for a) dealing with the problem of phagocytosing food b) dealing with the problems of not having a cell wall, and occasionally being dry. Osmoprotectants are small polar molecules that are easily retained by the cell, and are also really good at holding on to water. The contractile vacuole is a way of getting rid of excess water—coping with osmotic forces. c) dealing with the problem of being a large cell d) dealing with the problem of lateral gene transfer and recombination. e) dealing with the problem of locomotion 2. Bacteroides fragilis is a Gram-negative anaerobic Bacterium that lives in our guts. Some ecotypes of B. fragilis are mutualists, helping us to digest polysaccharides. However, some ecotypes of B. fragilis are pathogens. How would the mutualistic and pathogenic ecotypes of B. fragilis differ? a) their rRNA genes are probably different b) the pathogen probably ferments, while the mutualist respires c) the pathogen probably has a larger genome—ecotypes have the same basic genes for rRNA, metabolism, etc. A pathogen often has additional genes that give it the ability to cause disease—for example, the island in the next question. d) the pathogen probably lacks flagella
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 12

Final A key - Mic 102 Fall 10 Final Exam8 December 2010...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online