Lecture 5 fermentation and respiration

Lecture 5 fermentation and respiration - Fermentation uses...

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Unformatted text preview: Fermentation uses internally balanced redox reactions to generate ATP. 1. a Carbon compound gets oxidized, generating high-energy intermediate and reducing an e- carrier 2. ATP generated by substrate-level phosphorylation 3. NADH oxidized to NAD+ by reducing product of (2) and/or reducing protons from water, generating H 2 There are many, many forms of reduced carbon, and many, many ways to oxidize them. Glycolysis is one way to oxidize glucose for fermentation. Identify the step in this process where carbon is oxidized. Which carbon atom is oxidized? What gets reduced? sugars : hexoses, pentoses, you name it. amino acids : Ala, Glu, His, Asp, Gly, Ser, Try, Thr, Homoserine, Homocysteine, Met, Leu, Ile, Val, Phe, Arg... organic acids : lactate, acrylate, malate, fumarate, succinate, citrate, butyrate... alcohols : ethanol, ethylene glycol, methanol, resorcinol... purines/pyrimidines, precursors : Agmatine, allantoin, uracil, cytosine, adenine, thymine... Almost any organic compound can be oxidized as part of a fermentation. How can you tell an organic compound is getting oxidized? ATP is generated by substrate-level phosphorylation*...
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Lecture 5 fermentation and respiration - Fermentation uses...

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