lecture 16 genomics, systematics

lecture 16 genomics, systematics - is in the genome? What...

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Traditional genetics uses lots of hard work to give us very detailed information about model organisms. Genomics uses that information (along with the biological fact of evolution) to give us very good hypotheses about unstudied organisms.
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Comparative genomics has also yielded understanding.
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Comparing DNA sequences gives us improved abilities to measure “relatedness.” CTATCG C A ATCG CT G TCG C A CT G G CTA_CG CT G TCG CT G TCG CTA T CG
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small-subunit rRNA genes have become the standard for classiFcation. This is NOT undisputed.
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What is the overall character of the DNA--its GC ratio? How many ORFs does it have?
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1. Patient observation of a simple model organism.
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2. Hypothesis testing on a more complicated organism. Validation.
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3. Generating hypotheses about impossible-to- study organisms.
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Based on homology with known and well-studied genes, what
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Unformatted text preview: is in the genome? What are the really important parts of a protein? Comparative genomics can tell you. As we know, There are known knowns: There are things we know we know. We also know There are known unknowns. That is to say, We know there are some things We do not know. But there are also unknown unknowns--The ones we don't know We don't know. Unknown organisms with known genes? Known organisms with unknown genes? Unknown organisms with unknown genes? Genomic analysis provides insights that can not be had by traditional methods. We can compare the genomes of related organisms living in different niches--for instance, Vibrio fscheri and pathogenic Vibrio cholerae. We can see how genomes evolve due to drift and selection. Genomes are dynamic , constantly growing and shrinking....
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course MIC 102 taught by Professor Appleman during the Fall '08 term at UC Davis.

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lecture 16 genomics, systematics - is in the genome? What...

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