Midterm 1A key

Midterm 1A key - Mic102/Fa10/Appleman Quiz 1, 20 October...

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Mic102/Fa10/Appleman Quiz 1, 20 October 2010 This quiz is to represent only your own work . As a UC Davis student, you are bound by an honor code; if you can’t be trusted with that, can you be trusted in a career in, say, the health professions? Not only does this honor code demand personal integrity, but it also requires you to demand integrity from your peers. This quiz is closed book, closed note. Please hand in a blue scantron with the answers to the multiple-choice section of the quiz. Make sure that it has your name, student I.D.#, and Test form A ” filled in. \ We are still learning a lot about the microbial world around us. The bacteria in the family Roseobacter are a good example of this: twenty years ago, we were not even aware they existed, and now we know that they could be as many as a fifth of all the bacteria in the ocean. Different Roseobacter types dominate various marine environments, from the open ocean to arctic lakes. In addition to living in diverse habitats, members of the Roseobacter family have diverse metabolic abilities and growth habits. Shown here is Dinoroseobacter DFL12 (Biebl et al . 2005)
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You needed to place the Mn redox couple on the chart for a couple of answers. The Mn4+/Mn2+ couple goes just above the O2/H2O couple. 1. The first member of the Roseobacteria to be characterized was Roseobacter denitrificans , isolated from samples taken in the Sea of Japan. It appears to be capable of organotrophic growh, as it has been shown to use all the enzymes in the Entner- Doudoroff pathway. The Entner-Doudoroff pathway helps R. denitrificans by a) completely oxidizing glucose— no, it leaves pyruvate b) oxidizing fatty acids to acetyl-CoA— no, this is β -oxidation c) oxidizing 1 mol glucose to make 2 mol pyruvate, some ATP and reducing power d) producing 6 mol of ATP per glucose-- no. 2. R. denitrificans has also been shown to have and use the Krebs cycle. Does this suggest that R. denitrificans respires, rather than fermenting? a) yes, the Krebs cycle produces large amounts of NADH, a fuel for electron transport chains b) yes, the Krebs cycle requires oxygen, which is also useful for respiration— no, there’s no connection between the Krebs cycle and oxygen c) yes, the Krebs cycle occurs only in mitochondria, which also do respiration— this is half-true only for the case of Eukaryotes—and even then it’s not absolutely true. d) no, fermentation can regenerate NAD+ from the NADH produced by the Krebs cycle— not really, since it would require reducing CO2 to methane, which is thermodynamically near impossible. 3. R. denitrificans can respire, using succinate as an electron donor. How does using succinate differ from using gluose as an electron donor? a) there is no significant difference; succinate is oxidized to produce NADH, which feeds
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course MIC 102 taught by Professor Appleman during the Fall '08 term at UC Davis.

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Midterm 1A key - Mic102/Fa10/Appleman Quiz 1, 20 October...

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