BIS104_F10_Lecture5

BIS104_F10_Lecture5 - b. Different modes of movement of...

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Unformatted text preview: b. Different modes of movement of lipids in membranes Liquid crystalline Gel c. Lipid bilayer can lose its fluidity Phase change occurs at the transition temperature (Tm)! So, you know how to interpret the percentages of mosaics formed at different temperatures. d. Factors that affect the membrane fluidity i. The length of fatty acid chains in membrane phospholipids ii. Saturation status of the fatty acid chains of phospholipids • Double bonds in fatty acid chains make kinks, and they increase the fluidity Another example: phosphatidylcholine (PC) has two fatty acid chains of 16 carbons long, and both are saturated. Its Tm is ~40 o C. Introduction of a single double bond in the middle of one of the two chains would reduce Tm about 5 o C iii. Cholesterol in the membrane ¾ Interaction of rigid, plate-like steroid rings with fatty acid chains make lipid bilayer less fluid. ¾ But cholesterol also prevents fatty acid chains from coming together to become crystalline gel....
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course BIS 104 taught by Professor Scholey during the Fall '08 term at UC Davis.

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BIS104_F10_Lecture5 - b. Different modes of movement of...

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