BIS104_F10_Lecture11m

BIS104_F10_Lecture11m - c. Nuclear lamina: assembled by the...

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BIS 104(1) F10 Topic V: The Cytoskeleton 1. Introduction 2. Intermediate Filaments 3. Actin Filaments (Microfilaments) 4. Microtubules
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Xu et al., 1992. Plant Cell 4:941. 1. Introduction
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*Visualizing Microtubules and Microfilaments by Fluorescence Microscopy
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Actin filaments (microfilaments) Two-stranded helical polymers of the protein actin, with a diameter of 5-9 nm. Linear bundle-gel in the cell cortex. Intermediate filaments Ropelike fibers with a diameter of ~10 nm. They are made of proteins of a large heterogeneous family (e.g. lamin). Microtubules Long hollow cylinders with an outer diameter of 25 nm. More rigid than actin filaments. Typically have one end is attached to a microtubule organizing center (MTOC).
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2. Intermediate Filaments
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a. Different categories of Intermediate Filaments
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b. Assembly of the 10-nm ropelike Intermediate Filaments
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*eight tetramers join together to form the 10-nm filament
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Unformatted text preview: c. Nuclear lamina: assembled by the protein lamin d. Defective keratins: the cause of epidermolysis bullosa simplex From Fuchs and Cleveland, 1998. Science. 279:514 2. Actin filaments (Microfilaments) a. Actin is an ATPase: ATP hydrolysis decreases the stability of the filament b. Plus end vs. minus end _ + c. Treadmilling of actin filaments *Actin polymerization d. Actin filaments for cell morphology and motility *Microvilli of the epidermal cells of the human small intestine e. Actin-binding proteins (ABPs) govern/regulate the behavior of actin filaments * Example : Using the ARP2/3 complex to nucleate new actin filaments *Formin-assisted actin filament elongation *Actin polymerization at lamellipodium *Actin polymerization-driven cell migration * Monomeric G proteins play critical roles in regulating actin filament organization...
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course BIS 104 taught by Professor Scholey during the Fall '08 term at UC Davis.

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BIS104_F10_Lecture11m - c. Nuclear lamina: assembled by the...

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