{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

MATH 221 NOTES 6 SP 10

MATH 221 NOTES 6 SP 10 - MATH 221 Week6 Student Name...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MATH 221 Statistics for Decision - Making Lecture Notes     Week 6 Confidence Intervals Student Name         We shall now examine confidence intervals and their role in the field of inferential  statistics. Recall that Inferential Statistics is that branch of statistics that uses sample statistics to  formulate inferences about population parameters.   The key distinction between descriptive statistics and inferential statistics is that sample  data can be used to form a meaningful estimate of the population from which the sample  was drawn. Here are some key definitions to review. Population A population is considered as a complete set of measurements. Sample A sample is a subset of measurements taken from a population. Random Sample A random sample is a sample collected from the data in a random fashion.  Often  sampling means selection in an unbiased manner.   Parameter A parameter is a numeric descriptive measure taken from a population. Statistic A statistic is a numeric descriptive measure taken from a sample. Point Estimate A point estimate is a single value used to estimate a population parameter.  The sample  mean is the best point estimate of the population mean. Example 1  Consider the data below which represents a random sample of railway prices ( in dollars ) for a two - way ticket from Detroit to Chicago.   © Copyright 2010 by P.E.P. 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MATH 221 Statistics for Decision - Making Lecture Notes     Week 6 Confidence Intervals Student Name         Find a point estimate for the population mean. 99 100 102 105 95 98 120 100 99 94 Solution  The point estimate for the price of all two - way tickets from Detroit to Chicago is the  mean value of the above data or ( 99   +   100   +   102   +   105   +   95   +   98   +   120   +   100   +   99   +   94 ) / 10   =   101.20 For the subject of confidence intervals, we create intervals where an estimate can be  found and examine the probability ( level of confidence ) of locating the estimate within  the interval.
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}