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COMS3302Ch5 - COMS3302 Chapter5Putnam relevanttothem;...

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COMS 3302 Chapter 5--Putnam
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Any audience wants to see how your message is  relevant to them; how it will or can benefit Having a good relationship with your reader is  essential Adapting to an audience takes an effort Remember this is not about you! It’s about them! Chapter 5 2
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Using the “You” attitude The idea is to right with your audience’s needs in  mind; what can “we” do for “you” How “we” can  benefit “you” See pages 119-120 for samples of this done well Don’t overdo it—can sound phony Avoid the “you” attitude if there’s a problem It’s not “you screwed up!” But rather “we need to do  a better job.” Chapter 5 3
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Maintaining Standards of Etiquette Always show courtesy to your audience You can feel and think anything you wish, but when  you speak it or write it, you better be willing and able  to defend it Be certain to show tact with interacting with  company managers And always with customers Chapter 5 4
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Emphasize the Positive —page 122  It’s normally better to tell people what you  can  do  rather than what you  cannot When  you can have something ready as opposed to  when you cannot. The negative tone of a message can put people on  the defensive and be less willing to listen or keep  reading There are times when negative messages are needed  but usually best to be positive in tone Chapter 5 5
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Use Bias-Free Language —page 122-23 These are words or phrases that stigmatize or  categorize people in unjust or unfair ways Biased language draws attention to itself and away  from your goal or objective It is never helpful and the communicator’s “good  intent” is not an excuse Key areas are gender, race/ethnicity, age, and  disability—Table 5.1 on page 123. Chapter 5 6
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Use Bias-Free Language —page 123 1. Gender Bias —try to eliminate references to gender  like  he  or  she  if they are not needed in the message.  Some people don’t care, but others care a lot Unnecessary gender reference can be a distraction  or even cause a breakdown in the message’s goal Look for language you’re comfortable with while also  respecting your audience’s feelings Chapter 5 7
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Use Bias-Free Language —page 123 1.
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