COMS3302Ch6 - Completing Business Messages Completing...

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Unformatted text preview: Completing Business Messages Completing Business Messages COMS 3302 Chapter 6­­Putnam Revising Your Message Revising Your Message • The first draft of a business message should not be your last or final draft • Write it and then set it aside for a day or so • The second or third draft should help you find ways to tighten up your writing, add clarity to it, and make your message more effective Chapter 6 2 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Look for the Following Content—have you said all you need to say? Is it accurate and is it relevant to the reader? Have you chosen the right format? Is it direct or indirect? How well is your message organized? You can follow it but can anyone do so too? How readable is this? Do sentence lengths vary? Are paragraphs relatively short? Chapter 6 3 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Look for the Following Have you used some kind of bullet points in the body of the message to help keep the memo easy to scan and understand? Check your overall tone–be positive if possible. Negative if necessary. But never sarcastic or condescending Chapter 6 4 Edit for Clarity and Conciseness Clutter—(page 153) delete unnecessary phrases or words Redundancies—(page 153­54) get rid of words that say the same thing—like “free gift” or “surrounded on all sides.” An occasional redundancy is not horrible but too many bogs down writing and serves no useful purpose We tend to be more forgiving or verbal redundancies Chapter 6 5 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Edit for Clarity and Conciseness Hedging Sentences/Phrases— The process of over­qualifying something. “It seems to me that you may have exceeded your budget for the last quarter.”—too much hedging! “You overspent the budget last quarter.” Hedging is fine if you’re unsure and want to give room to interpretation Chapter 6 6 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Edit for Clarity and Conciseness Hedging Sentences/Phrases— But if you’re sure, don’t hedge. Be polite but be clear and firm. Too much hedging when certainty is needed makes you look indecisive and unsure. Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Chapter 6 7 Edit for Clarity and Conciseness Rising Intonation—the elevation of our voice (for spoken messages only—naturally) at the end of a declarative statement. When our voices rises at the end of a sentence— like with a question—it leaves the natural impression of wanting confirmation to what was said. But when it rises after a declarative statement it can make us sound uncertain or lacking in confidence Chapter 6 8 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Edit for Clarity and Conciseness Rising Intonation— Happening only occasionally is not a problem. Too often can began to erode our image as being competent and in control. In general, women are more likely to suffer from rising intonation than are men Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Chapter 6 9 Edit for Clarity and Conciseness Parallel Structure—using the same grammatical pattern for two or more similar ideas. Page 151­153 offers some examples “The President guided his employees, directed the shareholders’ meeting, and motivated the Wall Street investment firms.” Guided….directed….motivated—parallel structure improves the flow of the message Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Chapter 6 10 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Producing Your Message The production quality of your message is the overall effect on the reader (page 158) Much of good writing is a lot of small factors taken in their totality to create the overall message. Its elements are graphics, sounds, video, etc; how readable the message is; the technology used to create the message; and the formatting choices you make Chapter 6 11 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Producing Your Message 1. The graphics, sound, video, and hypertext—not really the focus of this course. 2. The readable quality of your message—stuff we’ve been talking about for a long time now! A readable message is pleasing not only to the eye (aesthetics) but also increases the odds of your audience complying with the goal of the message. Chapter 6 12 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Producing Your Message 2. The readable quality of your message—(figure 6.5 gives an example of this) Make the design consistent in type face, type size, colors, spacing, etc. Keep it in balance (subjective as this may be) Be restrained—don’t clutter your message up; simplicity is often the best choice in business. Chapter 6 13 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Producing Your Message 2. The readable quality of your message—(figure 6.5 gives an example of this) Pay attention to detail—make it easy on your readers to follow your ideas and find the information you offer them. Chapter 6 14 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Producing Your Message 1. Using Technology to Produce Your Message— Essentially this involves using Microsoft Word and/or PowerPoint® or some other similar type of technology. 1. Formatting Formal Letters and Memoranda Letters are formatted differently than are memos—remember that! Chapter 6 15 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Producing Your Message 1. Formatting Formal Letters and Memoranda Look at the letter sample on page 149 It has a date, inside address, salutation, complimentary close, and signature block. Your “bad news” letter for this class needs to follow those formatting guidelines Chapter 6 16 Revising Your Message Revising Your Message Producing Your Message 1. Formatting Formal Letters and Memoranda Look at the memo sample on page 164 It has a date, To:, From:, Subject:, with no salutation, complimentary close, or signature block. Your “Bubba’s Auto Parts” company memo for this class needs to follow those formatting guidelines Chapter 6 17 ...
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course COM 3302 taught by Professor Sdsd during the Spring '11 term at Tarrant County.

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