ANT 154B Course notes- Lecture _6

ANT 154B Course notes- Lecture _6 - ANT 154BN Course notes...

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Unformatted text preview: ANT 154BN Course notes Lecture #6: Locomotor ecology 20 January 2011 Key terms and concepts are indicated in blue Outline 1. Primate locomotor adaptations 2. Gibbons and macaques: a case study 1. Primate locomotor adaptations the study of locomotion is simply the study of how animals move primates extremely variable in locomotor behaviors Different ways of moving may provide a primate with better access to a particular type of forest structure, or more efficient traveling on a particular substrate. Feeding posture : some argue that positions may be as important in evolution as locomotion posture and locomotion often together called positional behavior Locomotor/positional behavior can be divided into several main classes, although there is considerable variation within each Different locomotor styles have observable effects on physiology Leaping (saltation) move between discontinuous supports Arboreal quadrupedalism movement on continuous network of branches Terrestrial quadrupedalism rapid movement on ground Terrestrial quadrupedalism rapid movement on ground Bipedalism frees hands for other tasks Suspensory climbing spread weight among supports, hanging avoids problem of balancing above support Terrestrial quadrupedalism Suspensory climbing Arboreal quadrupedalism Arboreal quadrupeds most common form of locomotion among primates generalized body form probably ancestral considerable variation (e.g., bounders vs. scramblers) Terrestrial quadrupeds relatively rare among primates a number of features that separate them from their arboreal relatives most related to use of flat, rel. uniform, stable structures Leapers many primates excellent leapers seems to evolved independently in many groups...
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course ANT 154bn taught by Professor Debello during the Winter '10 term at UC Davis.

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ANT 154B Course notes- Lecture _6 - ANT 154BN Course notes...

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