Week Fifteen Lecture - Security+ Guide to Network Security...

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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Third Edition Chapter 6 Wireless Network Security
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Third Edition Objectives Describe the basic IEEE 802.11 wireless security protections Define the vulnerabilities of open system authentication, WEP, and device authentication Describe the WPA and WPA2 personal security models Explain how enterprises can implement wireless security 2
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Third Edition IEEE 802.11 Wireless Security Protections Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) – The most widely known and influential organization for computer networking and wireless communications In the early 1980s, the IEEE began work on developing computer network architecture standards – This work was called Project 802 In 1990, the IEEE formed a committee to develop a standard for WLANs – That operate at a speed of 1 and 2 million bits per second (Mbps) 3
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Third Edition IEEE 802.11 Wireless Security Protections (continued) In 1997, the IEEE approved the IEEE 802.11 WLAN standard Revisions – IEEE 802.11a – IEEE 802.11b – IEEE 802.11g – IEEE 802.11n 4
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Third Edition Controlling Access Controlling wireless access of devices to the WLAN – Accomplished by limiting a device’s access to the access point (AP) By restricting access to the AP, only those devices that are authorized are able to connect to the AP and become part of the wireless network The IEEE 802.11 standard does not specify how to implement controlling access Almost all wireless AP vendors implement access control through Media Access Control (MAC) address filtering 5
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Third Edition Controlling Access (continued) MAC address filtering is usually implemented by permitting instead of preventing Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) – Designed to ensure that only authorized parties can view transmitted wireless information – Uses encryption to protect traffic The IEEE 802.11 committee designed WEP to meet the following criteria: – Efficient, exportable, optional, self-synchronizing, and reasonably strong 6
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Third Edition Controlling Access (continued) Device authentication – Wireless LANs cannot limit access to the wireless signal by walls or doors • Sometimes called data emanation Types of authentication supported by the 802.11 standard Open system authentication Shared key authentication 7
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Security+ Guide to Network Security Fundamentals, Third Edition Open System Authentication Vulnerabilities Open system authentication is considered weak because authentication is based on only one factor: – A match of SSID The easiest way to discover the SSID is to actually do nothing – Exploits the beaconing process
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This note was uploaded on 04/05/2011 for the course CINT 251 taught by Professor Endris during the Spring '11 term at Ivy Tech Community College.

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Week Fifteen Lecture - Security+ Guide to Network Security...

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