asthma - New research suggests that being exposed to things...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
New research suggests that being exposed to things like tobacco smoke, infections, and some allergens early in your life may increase your chances of developing asthma. Allergens Animal dander (from the skin, hair, or feathers of animals) Dust mites (contained in house dust) Cockroaches Pollen from trees and grass Mold (indoor and outdoor) Irritants Cigarette smoke Air pollution Cold air or changes in weather Strong odors from painting or cooking Scented products Strong emotional expression (including crying or laughing hard) and stress Others Medicines such as aspirin and beta-blockers Sulfites in food (dried fruit) or beverages (wine) A condition called gastroesophageal (GAS-tro-e-sof-o-JEE-al) reflux disease that causes heartburn and can worsen asthma symptoms, especially at night Irritants or allergens that you may be exposed to at your work, such as special chemicals or dusts Infections Asthma (Az-muh) is a chronic disease that affects your airways. The airways are the tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. If you have asthma, the inside walls of your airways are inflamed (swollen). The inflammation (IN-fla-MAY-shun) makes the airways very sensitive, and they tend to react strongly to things that you are allergic to or find irritating. When the airways react, they get narrower, and less air flows through to your lung tissue. This causes symptoms like wheezing (a whistling sound when you breathe), coughing, chest tightness, and trouble breathing, especially at night and in the early morning. Asthma cannot be cured, but most people with asthma can control it so that they have few and infrequent symptoms and can live active lives.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
During an asthma attack, muscles around the airways tighten up, making the airways narrower so less air flows through. Inflammation increases, and the airways become more swollen and even narrower. Cells in the airways may also make more mucus than usual. This extra mucus also narrows the airways. These changes make it harder to breathe. Quick-relief medicines—taken at the first signs of asthma symptoms for immediate relief of these symptoms. You will feel the effects of these medicines within minutes. Long-term control medicines—taken every day, usually over long periods of time, to prevent symptoms and asthma episodes or attacks. You will feel the full effects of these medicines after taking them for a few weeks. People with persistent asthma need long-term control medicines. Quick-relief medicines Everyone with asthma needs a quick-relief or "rescue" medicine to stop asthma symptoms before they get worse. Short- acting inhaled beta-agonists are the preferred quick-relief medicine. These medicines are bronchodilators . They act quickly to relax tightened muscles around your airways so that the airways can open up and allow more air to flow through. You should take your quick-relief medicine when you first begin to feel asthma symptoms, such as coughing, wheezing,
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/03/2011 for the course HUM 330 taught by Professor Na during the Spring '11 term at DeVry Plano.

Page1 / 7

asthma - New research suggests that being exposed to things...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online