211 Chapter_7

211 Chapter_7 - 7 AThe calling of the twelve The following...

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7 A The calling of the twelve @ The following includes Bruce R. McConkie = s commentary as it relates to this chapter of the student handbook. Jesus Heals A Man On The Sabbath Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.188 Seemingly Jesus deliberately sought out a man worthy to be healed so that he might exercise his curative powers on the Sabbath day. The interest and animosity resulting from this Sabbath miracle were such that our Lord gained an attentive, though largely disbelieving congregation of hearers, for what is perhaps his greatest recorded sermon of the relationship of the Father and the Son. Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.188 John 5:1. A feast of the Jews] The Passover. (J. Reuben Clark, Jr., Our Lord of the Gospels, p. 221.) If, according to the traditional view, this was a Passover feast, then the active ministry of Jesus lasted three and a half years; if, as some scholars have speculated, it was the Feast of Purim, which takes place about a month before the Passover, then our Lord's ministry was a year less. (Dummelow, p. 783; Jamieson, p. 135.) Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.188 2-7. No doubt the pool of Bethesda was a mineral spring whose waters had some curative virtue. But any notion that an angel came down and troubled the waters, so that the first person thereafter entering them would be healed, was pure superstition. Healing miracles are not wrought in any such manner. If we had the account as John originally wrote it, it would probably contain an explanation that the part supposedly played by an angel was merely a superstitious legend comparable to some that have since been devised by some churches of Christendom. Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.188 8-16. Few things illustrate more pointedly the direful apostasy of the Jewish nation than their perverted concepts about Sabbath observance. What had once been a holy and sacred law, which stood as a sign identifying the Lord's own peculiar people, had been turned into a hollow mockery of the original divine intent. Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.188 "The Scribes had elaborated from the command of Moses, a vast array of prohibitions and injunctions, covering the whole of social, individual, and public life, and carried it to the extreme of ridiculous caricature. Lengthened rules were prescribed as to the kinds of knots which might legally be tied on the Sabbath. The camel-driver's knot and the sailor's were unlawful, and it was equally illegal to tie or to loose them. A knot which could be untied with one hand might be undone. A shoe or sandal, a woman's cup, a wine or oil-skin, or a flesh-pot might be tied. A pitcher at a spring might be tied to the body-sash, but not with a cord. . . Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.189
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211 Chapter_7 - 7 AThe calling of the twelve The following...

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