211 Chapter_10

211 Chapter_10 - 10 AHe spake many things unto them in...

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10 A He spake many things unto them in parables @ The following includes Bruce R. McConkie's commentary as it relates to this chapter of the student handbook. This selection covers 40 pages in the book. Why Jesus Taught In Parables Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.251 Parables are short stories which point up and illustrate spiritual truths. Those spoken by Jesus deal with real events, or, if fictitious, are so consistent and probable that they may be viewed as the commonplace experiences of many people. Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.283 When opposition to his message became bitter and intense, the master Teacher chose to present many of the truths of salvation in parables in order to hide his doctrine from those not prepared to receive it. It was not his purpose to cast pearls before swine. (Mormon Doctrine, p. 500.) Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.283 - p.284 Parables seldom clarify a truth; rather, they obscure and hide the doctrine involved so that none but those already enlightened and informed, on the very point presented, are able to grasp the full meaning. Nowhere is this better illustrated than in the parable of the wheat and the tares. When Jesus first gave this parable, even the disciplec did not understand it. They asked for the interpretation, and he gave it, partially at least. And then with both the parable and the interpretation before the world, the Lord still had to give a special revelation in latter-days so Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.284 The allegory of the tame and the wild olive tree, as given by Zenos, is in the same category. (Jacob 5.) Even in this day of spiritual enlightenment, there are parts of it which are hidden from the understanding of the saints. If the Lord had intended that people generally should know the full meaning of this allegory and of his various parables, he could have presented the truths involved in plain language, and there would have been no room for doubt or speculation. Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.284 But had Jesus taught all of his doctrine in plainness, such would have added to the condemnation of his hearers. (D. & C. 82:2-4). His use of parables to hide the full and deep import of portions of his message was an act of mercy on his part. Should any of his hearers later come to a knowledge of the truth, they would then remember his simple stories and gain from them the message he intended. On the other hand, those already spiritually enlightened receive recurring flashes of knowledge by recalling the stories involved. As they continue their temporal pursuits of sowing, planting, harvesting, fishing, and mixing bread, they are reminded continually of eternal gospel truths. Bruce R. McConkie, Doctrinal New Testament Commentary, Vol.1, p.284
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211 Chapter_10 - 10 AHe spake many things unto them in...

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